Archive for the ‘Residential Arizona Sod’ Category

Leave It To The Pros: Why You Should Have Your Sod Professionally Installed

Wednesday, June 29th, 2022

If you’re searching online for “sod installation near me,” it’s obvious you’re considering upgrading your lawn. This is the best choice for you if you want to have a quick, easy and affordable lawn without the hassle of learning everything from scratch. We all know how busy a person’s life can be and you might not always have the time and energy to take care of your own lawn. If you’re still not sold on hiring professionals for the job, here’s why you should leave your sod installation to the professionals.

Why You Should Let the Pros Install Your Sod:

  • Weekends are meant for play and fun, not worrying about what to do about your lawn. Evergreen Turf will do the worrying for you and will be there to install the same day your sod is delivered
  • Evergreen Turf is the best professional sod company in Arizona. We have a team of highly skilled craftsmen with years of experience in sod installations. You can rest easy knowing that your lawn will be taken care of by people who know what they are doing and produce the best lawn you and your family deserve.
  • An added difficulty of installing a lawn yourself is when there are other elements on your property such as sprinkler heads, decorations, and walkways. Doing it yourself can be tiring without getting the result you want. Those other elements in your yard need expert precision and skill to cut around to avoid damage to the sod as well as minimize the scrap
  • Installing sod is not as simple as just putting on the layer of sod and waiting. It takes skilled craftsmen to make sure that the sod is properly installed with no patches or spots that are less attractive. Evergreen Turf crews will roll the sod and ensure that there is good soil contact for the sod to take hold as well as apply the starter fertilizer to increase the chances of your sod successfully rooting quickly.
  • With professionals, you get what you pay for. You won’t have to worry about Evergreen Turf’s crew, they do this every day. You can sit back and enjoy. Please note, we do not perform work outside the terms of the contract which includes prep work, sprinkler work or rototilling.

Types of Sod You Can Buy at Evergreen Turf:

Midiron

This is the grass of choice in Arizona. It is an attractive and low-maintenance lawn that is perfect for busy people who still want to have a beautiful lawn they can enjoy without too much hassle. The grass itself has a medium-coarse leaf texture with a refreshing blue-green color. It is an excellent plant that transitions well from winter over-seeding and recovers quickly from people stepping on it. It can be maintained with a reel mower or a sharp rotary mower. It has a mowing height of 3/4″ to 1 1/2″.

Keep in mind that Midiron has low shade tolerance, which means it is perfect for a lawn that is under the sun. Also, it is a much sturdier grass than others with moderate salinity tolerance and will always be suitable for Arizona weather with its good drought tolerance.

Tifway 419

  • Tifway 419 is the lawn of choice for professional sports fields and golf courses. It is preferred to other Bermuda grass because of its ability to recover from damage from constant and heavy use. This variety has extraordinary durability and a beautiful dark green color and medium-fine texture. This grass is an excellent choice for lawns that will be seeing constant use. This variety can be cut using a sharp rotary motor or a reel motor for a manicured look.

It is the perfect lawn if it is constantly exposed to sunlight but will have difficulty if placed in a mostly shaded area. It is also moderately tolerant to salinity and will be able to grow even if the area it is placed in has salt and is an excellent variant for hot regions. It has a mowing height of 1/2” to 1 1/2″.

Tifgreen328

  • This variety of grass has a bright green color and a very fine texture. Initially developed for use in golf courses, it is the perfect choice if you want a manicured appearance for your lawn. Its beauty is the primary reason why it is used in expensive golf courses and it is the perfect choice if you want the same quality lawn for your home. It can be mowed with a sharp rotary mower but you can find the best results when you use a reel mower.

This variety also has a fair damage recovery rating that is still hardy compared to other grasses with poor shade tolerance, which is perfect for a lawn that gets lots of sunlight. It has a moderate salinity tolerance which means it’s not as susceptible to moderate concentrations of salt in the soil. It has a fair drought tolerance which means that it needs a little bit more water than the varieties we have discussed so far.

TifGrand

  • TifGrand Bermuda is a product of scientific development and boasts a 60% resistance to shade and requires only about 4-5 hours of direct sunlight. Although it requires a more difficult maintenance routine in full sun conditions, TifGrand is an excellent variety for a lawn, especially because it has a fine texture and a beautiful dark green color. It can be mowed using a reel or a shaft rotary mower at the height of 1/2” to 1 ½” height.

This variety has a fair damage recovery rating and a moderate salinity tolerance. It is also rated fair for drought tolerance. It is a less sturdy variety overall but it is tolerant to shade which means you don’t have to worry too much about this variety dying if they don’t get the right amount of sunlight which is important if you plan to have a lot of shade in your lawn.

Palmetto St. Augustine

  • This variety is the best performer in shady conditions and is highly recommended by the Evergreen Turf crew. This variety is a semi-dwarf variety of St. Augustine grass and thrives in both sunlight, shade, and heat. It has a coarse texture with soft leaves that makes it comfortable to lie on if you just want to relax and on the grass.

It also has a bright green color, perfect for that pleasantly eye-catching shade of green people look for on a lawn. However, it requires a little bit more care since it should not be overseeded during the winter. If you want to mow this grass, it is recommended that you use a Reel or sharp rotary mower at a height of 1 1/2″ to 3” for best results.

TifTuf

  • TifTuf is the best hybrid bermudagrass you will ever encounter regarding drought tolerance. This means that it can go longer without being watered. It is developed by the University of Georgia Research Program and is among the best strains they were able to produce. It has fine texture with a dark green color and can survive with 30% less water than the best hybrid Bermuda grass currently in the market today. It has a similar look to Tifway but is a sturdier variety and improved color during the winter. It also has the added benefit of being able to green up quicker when spring comes than other strains of grass.

For best results, you should mow this grass with a reel mower or a sharp rotary mower at a height of 1/2″ to 1 1/2″. It has a good salinity tolerance and fair shade tolerance with high damage recovery.

No need to search any further for sod installation near you. Contact Evergreen Turf today and get back to enjoying your weekend while we take care of all the hard work. The lawn of your dreams is just one call away!

Guide to New Sod: 3 Mistakes to Avoid and 3 Tips for Success

Wednesday, May 4th, 2022

If you are a homeowner about to install new sod, there are several things that you should know that many homeowners wished they knew when they started. These tips will help you save a lot of time and money and at the same time keep your sod looking amazing just like those maintained by professionals. Keeping sod does not need to be difficult or expensive as long as you follow these simple and easy-to-do tips.

How much should I water new sod?

The riskiest time for sod is when it is just newly installed. This is particularly true in times and places where high temperatures are common such as those we experience here in Arizona. Summer days are among the most dangerous as they could lead to several patches of sod drying out and destroying the overall beauty of your sod.

The best time to water established lawns is either in the morning or the evening.  This is because if you water your lawn in the middle of the day when it’s very warm, the water will evaporate quickly.

For new sod that has been recently installed, we recommend watering 4-8 times a day for about 5-10 minutes each. You just need to do this for the first two weeks following installation and then you can cut down to watering once a day for about 15-45 minutes each. When the sod is properly established you can water your lawn 2-3 times a week for 10-25 minutes each time.

Related: Lawn Care – Sod Irrigation

This schedule changes during colder times such as winter (for overseeded sod) where you should water twice a day for 10-15 minutes for the first two weeks after installation and only once a day after that for 15-20 minutes each. For well-established lawns during the colder times, you should keep an eye on the weather since it will dictate the amount and frequency of watering.

The general rule of thumb here is that when you are experiencing hotter weather, you should water more frequently but when you are experiencing colder weather, you can water your sod less frequently.

You can make this easier for you by hiring professionals to take care of all the needs of your sod. You might have to dole out some cash but this way you will ensure that you remove the guesswork of taking care of your lawn and the risk of having patches of your lawn die or dry out.

When Should I Fertilize?

To get the best results for a healthy lawn, fertilizing should be done every 30 days. Just like humans, lawns need good nutrition to keep them free from weeds and disease. This will help them to thrive and look healthy. The best Nitrogen-Phosphate-Potassium (N-P-K) ratio of fertilizer we recommend is a 21-7-14 or 16-8-4.

Keeping a good fertilizing schedule is important because fertilizers nourish your lawn. Look at fertilizers as food for plants and when you give them an adequate amount of food, they will grow and take root properly, which will protect your lawn from extreme weather or temperatures as well as other stressors that the lawn might encounter. However, you should keep in mind that you might have to reassess your fertilizing schedule depending on the type of sod you are using since different varieties of sod have different needs. You should also consider the weather and season when planning your fertilizing schedule.

During springtime, you should consider having a fertilizing schedule for early spring and late spring. During early spring, plants are generally waking up from their hibernation during the winter. This means that they have expended much of their stored nutrients during this time and require more care. On the other hand, during late spring, your lawn needs all the help it can get to prepare for the coming stresses of summer and fall.

During the summer, in hotter areas like Arizona, your lawn is experiencing heavier stress because of the heat and bugs. Fertilizing during this time will help make sure that your lawn keeps healthy going into the fall.

Related: Lawn Care – Sod Nutrition

When fall comes, so will the opportunity to entertain guests and other outdoor entertainment. This is also the season when your lawn begins to prepare for another growth period. This means that your sod needs more nutrients to help keep it healthy and strong. However, this is also the best time for your sod to thrive since nature is giving you a hand. You will be experiencing more rainfall and cooler times during this time which will make taking care of your lawn easier.

If you want more information about when to fertilize your lawn, you can go to Evergreenturf.com and get expert advice on the best fertilizing schedule for your lawn.

How Long Does It Take New Sod to Root?

This is a difficult question to answer simply. Sod taking root generally has two stages: Formation of shallow roots and formation of deep roots. To get the best results, you should give sod the right care during these periods to ensure that your lawn thrives in the long term. Strong roots mean that sod becomes more resilient against any stressors that it might encounter.

Forming shallow roots can begin as early as two weeks. To help this process along, you should water your new lawn right after the sod is installed. After the first week of laying the sod, it is recommended that you water your sod daily to make the process quicker. You need to take particular care during this stage since this process is among the most sensitive times for the sod. Avoiding adding stress to your lawn during this time will help it grow and thrive in the future. You should minimize stepping on it or adding any kind of weight to allow it time to grow the roots it needs for the future.

Related: How Long Does it Take for Sod to Root

On the other hand, deep roots require that you water your sod less. This will encourage your lawn to develop deep roots. If done right, your sod will be able to develop deep roots in about 30-45 days. When this happens, it is a sign that your lawn is ready to face added pressure such as mowing and foot traffic.

Be sure to wait to mow your lawn for the first time after 48 hours or two days after watering to prevent damage to the grass blades. Also, set your mower to 3 inches. This is the optimum height for your lawn to keep healthy during this sensitive time.

To further encourage faster rooting, you can use a lawn roller right after the sod is installed. Rolling the sod carefully will allow the new sod and the topsoil to adhere faster and will also remove air pockets that will slow the growth rate of roots. You can also start fertilizing your lawn after six weeks of installation.

To help this process along, you should also prepare the soil where the sod will be placed. Most grass species thrive on acidic, well-drained soil. You can add Sulfur, Compost, and Lime to your soil before the installation of sod to prepare it. This will increase the chances of a fully healthy and great-looking lawn that will begin taking root in about two weeks.

If you need more information about preparing your soil, you can go to Evergreenturf.com and receive advice from experts in this industry. If you want to remove the guesswork when installing the best high-quality sod, we also offer installation for a reasonable price!

Mistakes to Avoid

Don’t Overwater before Installing New Sod

We know that getting new sod can be an exciting prospect and you want to do everything you can to make sure that the installation goes smoothly. You might be tempted to overwater your lawn thinking that it will help make the installation and growth go faster but this is more dangerous and might negatively affect a successful installation. Muddy grounds make working on it more difficult and can lead to poor sod growth. What you want here is to keep the lawn just moist but not soaked. Please see above for watering schedules that provide the moisture your sod needs and help you avoid overwatering.

Don’t Mow Too Soon

Mowing can cause severe damage to a newly installed sod. Do not mow your new sod lawn until about two weeks after installation. However, keep in mind that you must remove only 1/3 of the leaf blade to prevent scalping or damaging the new lawn. This means that you might have to mow your lawn more frequently or about every 3 days to reach the growing height that you want but we promise you it will be worth it.

Mowing a lawn depends on how quickly your sod is growing. There are some varieties and conditions that grow faster like Tiffgreen sod lawn where you might have to mow every 2-3 days as compared to midiron hybrid Bermuda sol lawn which needs to be mowed once every 7-19 days. This might require you to mow more often but as long as you remember the general rule “never remove more than 1/3 of the leaf” then you should be fine.

Related: Lawn Care – Mowing Sod

If you plan on mowing less often, you should also remember that you should keep your mowing height up and the fertility of your land down. Keeping your fertility low will slow the growth of your grass and the higher mowing height allows for more leeway for the grass to grow without it becoming cumbersome and remain looking crisp even with less frequent maintenance mowing. However, the best-looking lawns are those that follow these three things mow lower, fertilize frequently, and mow frequently. If you need more information about mowing, follow this link and read more https://www.evergreenturf.com/lawn-care/mowing.php

Another thing to keep in mind is when dealing with new sod, your first mowing should start when your sod has been established for one week. You will also have to cut back on watering the sod to keep the ground firm enough and not leave any marks when you mow. Follow the general rule that you should not remove more than 1/3 of the leaf and the mower blade must be sharp when mowing for the first time on newly installed sod. Keeping your lawnmower’s blade sharp will prevent pulling and leaving yellow scalped areas on the new lawn.

You should also start thinking of the lawnmowing equipment you plan to use on your lawn as early as you can. There are generally two types of mowing equipment, and both have their pros and cons. The first type of mowing equipment is the electric or gas reel mowers. These machines have typically 7 or 10 blades and are used to mow grass up to ¾ of an inch. They tend to cost more and require more maintenance, but they give a higher quality cut as compared to the rotary push mowers and can mow as low as 1/3 of an inch. They are recommended for any type of grass

On the other hand, rotary push mowers, or more commonly, push mowers, can be used to mow lawns between 3/4 to 3 inches. They are cheaper, hardier, and require less maintenance as compared to electric or gas reel mowers but they don’t produce as good as cut. They also can’t cut below ¾ of an inch which makes for a less crisp look to your lawn. However, they are ideal for Midiron, Paspalum, St. Augustine, and Celebration Bermudagrass variants.

Be Careful with Weed Control

Herbicides are substances that kill or prevent the growth of plants in an area. You can use them to keep your lawn safe from unwanted plants and weeds and keep your lawn looking amazing. There are several kinds of herbicides you can use and one of them is called post-emergent herbicides. These substances affect weeds after they have sprouted and established themselves on your lawn. On the other hand, there are herbicides called pre-emergent herbicides that are used before you can observe any signs of weeds.

Post-emergence herbicides can control existing weed growth and help prevent future ones but can be dangerous for certain kinds of plants and sod varieties so you must use the right kind of herbicides for your use. There is also a particular way you should be using them to work properly to keep the plants you want unaffected. Be sure to look into how they are used properly.

There are different kinds of post-emergent weed killers. They generally fall under systemic and contact herbicides.  Systemics are the most effective when used on perennial or long-time weeds since it goes directly into the plant for the best results. On the other hand, contact herbicides only kill the exposed portions of the plant and are effective on annuals or smaller weeds since killing the exposed parts would likely lead to the whole plant dying.

Knowing the right kind of herbicide to use can determine whether or not your efforts kill only the weeds and not affect the plants you want to be unaffected. This requires an understanding of the substance and its careful application.

Pre-emergent herbicides are generally more effective to control weeds before they have grown, while post-emergent herbicides can be used any time after the weeds have grown. Be careful though, as a lot of post-emergent herbicides could damage the lawn if used too much or applied at the wrong time. Always read the instructions on using herbicides before applying any kind of chemical to your sod grass lawns. You can learn more here https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/weeds/post-emergent-herbicides.htm.

Conclusion

Taking care of new sod can be easy as long as you know the basics of sod care. Many people don’t take the time and effort to learn this and as a result, they find a less than ideal looking patch of land. This costs them time, money, and effort when they simply could have done a little bit of research. These simple tips and tricks to take care of your newly installed lawn will be helpful to you as you begin your taking proper and active care of your lawn.

If you would rather remove the guesswork on your lawn care and choose to ask professionals for help, contact Evergreen Turf today. We have been in the industry since 1999, and we pride ourselves in being a locally owned and operated Arizona sod farm.

How Much Does it Cost to Have Sod Installed (2022)

Wednesday, October 20th, 2021

Even the best-maintained lawns have expiration dates. If you haven’t re-sodded your lawn in years, or are noticing issues with weeds or the quality of your grass, it may be time to re-sod.

There are two main ways you can go about it: do-it-yourself (DIY) or professional re-sodding.

The DIY route is typically less expensive, but it takes much more time to complete—and there’s a greater risk of error. Pros are quicker and guarantee quality but generally cost more up-front.

Luckily, lawn replacement costs tend to be lower for a re-sod project than they are for an initial install, whether going at it alone or bringing in professional help. Below, we’ll cover what it costs on average to re-sod in Phoenix, Tucson, and all of Arizona—and how you can get the best deal.

Baseline Re-sodding Cost Factor: Lawn Size

Before diving into the differences between DIY and professional re-sodding, you’ll need to answer the most important question for determining how much your re-sodding project will cost. How much re-sodding are you doing—how big is the lawn you’re planning to re-sod?

Realtor magazine estimates the average residential yard size in the US at a quarter of an acre, or 10,871 square feet, with the lawn taking up 3,000sq ft of that space. However, per the same dataset, the average yard in Arizona is 6,500 sq ft, with the lawn area averaging only 700 sq. ft.

So to simplify calculations, we’ll use 3,000 sq. ft for US averages and 700 sq. ft. for Arizona estimates.

There’s also the cost of sod itself. How much does turf cost in Arizona and across the US?

HomeGuide estimates sod cost per square foot to be between $0.34 to $0.85 nationally. In Arizona, quality sod tends to be on the higher end of that spectrum, selling at about $0.70 per sq. ft on average. We’ll use those figures, respectively, in our estimated calculations below.

These fundamentals are just the starting point for setting up total DIY and pro re-sodding costs.

How Much Does Do-It-Yourself Sodding Cost?

DIY re-sodding is a much more involved and arduous process than hiring a professional (or team thereof) to re-sod your lawn. However, it’s a rewarding project, positioning the sod is typically a straightforward process, and the base costs are lower. Still, there are a lot of complicating factors that can make the total project more expensive than it may seem.

If we look just at the basic cost per foot for the sod, the breakdown is as follows:

  • DIY re-sodding nationally – $1,020-$2,400 for a 3,000 sq. ft lawn
  • DIY re-sodding in Arizona – $490 for a 700 sq. ft lawn

But these prices can be quite misleading. They assume that your lawn is already prepared for the re-sodding and you have all the necessary equipment ready to go. If that’s the case, skip ahead!

More likely, you’ll need to account for prep and other expenses, which can add up quickly.

In Arizona , an at-home PH correction kit may cost as little as $20, but you may need to spend more if the existing level is far from where it needs to be. Equipment for grading, tilling, and spreading fertilizer will each cost upwards of $50 to rent for four hours at a time. Fertilizer typically runs around $20 per bag, and you should look to apply about 1 pound of nitrogen per 1000 sq. ft—be sure to calculate carefully, as fertilizer comes in different nitrogen grades.

And, to bring it back to lawn size, these ancillary costs are also impacted. A bigger plot will take more resources and more time to prep, inflating material and rental costs of DIY re-sodding.

How Much Does Professional Re-sodding Cost?

Compared to DIY efforts, professional re-sodding will make the project significantly faster and easier for you to manage. And, depending on the individual or team you use, you’ll likely see little to no need for additional equipment and resources—beyond buying the sod itself.

However, all that convenience comes at a price; professional re-sodding is more expensive.

According to HomeGuide, per-foot costs for professional re-sodding shoot all the way up to $0.90 to $1.80 on average—an increase of over 100% at both the low and high ends. Again, Arizona prices are on the higher end of the spectrum, as the contractor network HomeBlue estimates that pro re-sodding costs across Maricopa county range from $1.40 to $2.80 per sq. ft on average.

Using the same lawn sizes from above, total average costs for pro re-sodding break down to:

  • Pro re-sodding Nationally – $4,200 – $8,400 for a 3,000 sq. ft lawn
  • Pro re-sodding In Arizona – $980 – $1,960 for a 700 sq. ft lawn

Even though these costs are significantly higher than DIY, the benefits outweigh the costs. First of all, you save the time and effort of sod (re)installation—think of this as staving off backaches.

Second, hiring professionals to re-sod makes it far less likely that any costly mistakes are made, which extends the life of your new lawn, simplifies maintenance, and prevents repair work down the line. These are both direct savings and a near-guarantee of fewer headaches.

And, for those looking to re-sod smaller lawns, costs might not be so astronomically high.

In Arizona, at least, it’s not uncommon to find flat labor rates under $1000 dollars for re-sodding projects in the ~500 sq. ft range—not including the costs for the sod itself. But professional rates will generally be better for larger projects than for smaller ones.

Other Factors Impacting re-sodding Costs

When you’re planning a DIY or pro re-sodding project, size and square footage aren’t the only factors you need to consider. For example, your specific location might drive prices up or down.

Sod in Phoenix may cost the same as sod in Tucson, but professionals’ rates may differ.

Other micro-factors include complications in the shape and size of your lawn. For example, oddly shaped lawns may necessitate excess product. Or installation might require a level of skill in shaping the rolls of sod to the contours of your property, which could force you into a professional installation.

There’s also the quality of your soil and other conditions the sod is subject to. Natural rockiness, susceptibility to weeds, and lawn use are all important considerations, as is the level of shade it experiences.

These elements are all complicated further by the kind of grass you’re installing.

Keeping costs down isn’t just about how much you pay for the sod itself or for its initial installation. It takes careful management before, during, and after the re-sod project. Refer to our how to install sod guide for more details on how to maintain your freshly re-sodded lawn.

It always helps to use the highest quality sod available—and for that, we have you covered.

Re-sod Your Arizona Lawn with Evergreen Turf

Re-sodding projects can range widely in price, both across the country at large and within the great state of Arizona. Opting to re-sod on your own will likely mean lower up-front costs, but the higher price tag that comes with a professional installation can lead to longer-term savings.

Whatever option you choose, Evergreen Turf will make sure you’re getting the most bang for your buck. We have the best quality Arizona sod, perfect for any initial install or re-sod project.

If you’re looking for turf, or have any questions about this piece, contact our team today!

 

How to Bring Your Lawn Back to Life in Spring and Summer

Wednesday, July 22nd, 2020

In a perfect world, dead grass would just come back to life and start growing again. However, that is not the way it works. So if you’re looking at your brown lawn and wondering, “Will dead grass grow back?” Here is your answer:

Dead grass will not grow back; you will need to buy fresh sod to make your lawn look good again. That being said – there is a difference between dormant and dead grass. If your grass is dormant it will come back; it’s just not growing during a particular season.  

Will dead grass grow back? We answer your question in this article.

To check if your grass is dormant or dead, it helps to know the type of grass you have. Bermuda grass, like Midiron for example, is a type of grass that goes dormant in the winter. When grass is dormant, you can tell because it will usually pull out easily. It’s also important to check the roots—white roots are good and live, while black roots indicate the grass is dead or dying.

What are the Main Causes of Patchy Grass?

Patchy grass can result from either dead or dormant grass. If your entire lawn is dead, you will need to remove the dead grass, prep the soil, and lay new sod.

When your whole lawn is the same brown color, the grass may be dormant. Cool-season grasses will go dormant in the summer when the sun produces prolonged periods of hot temperatures, while warm-season grasses will go dormant during the winter. In these cases, the grass is still alive and will come back to life and return to a beautiful hue when its intended season returns.

If your lawn is green in some areas and brown in others, you might be dealing with dead patches in the lawn but not an entirely dead lawn. To fix dead patches, rake out the dead area gingerly, fertilize it, and water it; eventually, it should come back.

Should You Sprinkle Seed to Fix Patches of Dead Grass?

This is a common question. The answer is that you do not need to buy seed and sprinkle it on your lawn. If you do decide to seed, you need to know which type of grass you have. Many grasses are hybrid, which means they do not produce seeds. The exception to this rule is winter (cool season) sod; seed sprinkling would work for winter sod because these grasses (fescue, for example) do have seeds.

Instead of seeding, you might consider buying small patches of sod to fix dead patches. If you sprinkle seed on dead patches and you don’t know why type of sod you have, you will end up with a non-uniform lawn texture and appearance.

What Are Some Ways to Grow Grass in Arizona?

If you want your grass to remain green year-round regardless of the temperature, you can plant a mixture of cool- and warm-season grasses. This process is called overseeding. Overseeding enables your lawn to grow thicker, produce a better color, and have greater resistance to pests and the elements because there’s more seed-to-soil contact. Overseeding for a winter lawn should begin around October in Arizona. Conversely, your summer lawn prep should begin in the late spring or early summer.

Scalping for Early Summer Grass

In the late spring or early summer, you should scalp your lawn to get rid of the dead tissue that builds up on the sod over time. In doing so, you will give way for new tissue to come in. Once you have scalped your lawn, give it a little food because that is what it will need to grow. There are wrong and right ways to transition your Arizona sod lawn in the springtime. For example, the type of fertilizer you choose matters, as does the ongoing temperature. Be sure to read up on the type of grass you have and the appropriate steps for transitioning your lawn in the spring or fall before you set to work on your lawncare plan.

So there you have it. We hope this article has helped answer your questions about dead grass growing back.

At Evergreen Turf, we are proud to be Arizona’s lawncare experts. We invite you to stop by our location in Chandler, Arizona if you have questions or need help ensuring your lawn is as beautiful and bountiful as it can possibly be. If you have a dead lawn, we can help you choose the right grass for your unique home or office property.

All About Hybrid Bermuda Grass

Thursday, July 11th, 2019

Hybrid bermuda grasses are a popular choice for home lawns in Arizona. They come in different varieties. One of the most popular choices for home lawns in Arizona is Midiron. Other popular varieties include Tifway, Tifgreen and TifGrand. All of these varieties are hybrid bermuda grass, meaning two species with desirable traits are bred to create a high-quality grass.

Hybrid bermuda grasses are designed to be drought and heat-tolerant. Some varieties, such as TifGrand, are also more shade-tolerant. Hybrid grasses are also hypoallergenic because they do not produce any pollen – making them a great choice for people with allergies. Most are also bred to be resistant to insects and disease.

In addition, hybrid bermuda grass is often thicker than other types, which means it can prevent more weeds.

To give you an idea of how popular each variety of hybrid bermuda grass is for home lawns in our area, this is how much of each type we sell on average:

  • 80% Midiron
  • 15% Tifway
  • 3% TiffGrand
  • 2% Tifgreen

We’ve created an infographic with this information as well, for those visually-inclined folks. Check it out on our Facebook page.

Here’s a breakdown of each sod variety to help you choose which one is right for you:
green blades of grass, up close

Midiron

  • Most popular in Arizona
  • Drought tolerant
  • Low maintenance

Tifway 419

  • Most durable variety
  • Drought tolerant
  • Extra maintenance

Tifgreen 328

  • Very fine texture
  • Bright green color
  • Highly manicured appearance

TifGrand Bermuda

  • True sun and shade grass
  • Dark green color
  • Fine Texture

Palmetto St. Augustine

  • Best for shade, but excellent in sun as well
  • Bright green color
  • Low maintenance

Still not sure which one to choose? Take our quiz to find the right sod for your lawn.

FAQ: How Often Should I Fertilize Bermuda Grass?

Tuesday, June 18th, 2019

A question we get asked frequently around here is…

“How often should I fertilize Bermuda grass?”

how often to fertilize your Bermuda sod lawn

It’s a great question and knowing the answer will help ensure that you have the healthiest lawn possible; one that thrives through the warm months of the year.

So here is your answer:

You should fertilize your Bermuda grass about once a month in the spring using a quick-release, complete fertilizer Once your lawn is fully green and dense, you can switch to a slow-release fertilizer. This will slow the growth of your lawn, so it doesn’t become overgrown.

It’s important to switch to a slow-release fertilizer once your lawn is dense, so that you won’t get a lot of growth. This ensures you’re caring for your lawn in the most efficient manner.

We have several other articles related to the topic of Bermuda grass, including midiron, and fertilizer on our site. Here’s a round-up of those articles, in case you’re still curious or have some other questions.

Other Helpful Articles

How To Get Rid of Weeds – This article describes the most common weeds in Arizona and how to eliminate them from your lawn.

Effects of Over-fertilizing – This article explains how you can accidentally over-fertilize your lawn. It also tells you how to repair an over fertilized lawn.

Can I Fertilize My Lawn in the Summer – This article answers that question and gives additional fertilization tips.

Best Fertilizer for Bermuda Grass – This article goes into detail on which fertilizer is best to use on your Bermuda sod, depending on the time of year and the maturity stage of your lawn.

Common Lawncare Mistakes and How to Avoid Them – This article helps you avoid the most common lawn care mistakes that homeowners make.

Best Time of Year to Aerate Your Bermuda Grass Lawn – This article explains the process of aerating your lawn, why it is important, and when is the best time of year to do so.

About Evergreen Turf

Here at Evergreen Turf, we pride ourselves on being your go-to source for sod in Arizona. Whether you just need tips on how to keep your lawn healthy year-round or you need to purchase sod from us, we have you covered. We even offer installation of our sod products, so you don’t have to worry about installing it yourself.

Not sure which type of sod is right for your lawn? Take our quiz to help you select which variety of sod is suited for your unique conditions. For all things related to lawn care, be sure to check out our lawn care section on our website, which covers everything from irrigation and mowing to nutrition, insect control and fall over-seeding.

If you have any other questions about Arizona sod, whether it has to do with fertilizing your Bermuda sod or anything else, contact our team today and let us know how we can help you. You can also ask us questions or just say hi on our Facebook page!

Top 10 Tips for Arizona Sod

Thursday, June 6th, 2019

Here at Evergreen Turf, we talk about sod a lot! In fact, we’ve been writing blog posts and articles on how best to care for your sod lawn in Arizona for over a decade. People from Phoenix to Tucson and the cities in between turn to us, not just for sod installations, but for lawn care tips. Why? Because they know they can trust us to provide accurate information on creating healthy lawns in Arizona. Here is a collection of our top 10 tips for Arizona sod, from our article archive. Enjoy!

Rye grass is a great choice for Arizona lawns in the winter

Best Fertilizer for St Augustine Grass

The best fertilizer for St Augustine grass will vary, but the rule of thumb is one pound of nitrogen for every 1,000 square feet. Fertilizing every two months is ideal unless you apply slow-release nitrogen that can be spread every 10 weeks. There are numerous fertilizers marketed for St. Augustine specifically such as Lesco St. Augustine Lawn Fertilizer, Dr. Earth Organic Super Natural Lawn Fertilizer and Pennington’s Weed and Feed product.

Learn more here: https://www.evergreenturf.com/best-fertilizer-for-st-augustine-grass.php

How Long Does It Take For Sod To Take Root

The process takes about two weeks for shallow roots and up to six weeks to establish deep root growth.

Be sure to read the full article for tips on how to encourage deep root growth, as well as how to best prepare your soil for sod. Learn more here: https://www.evergreenturf.com/How-Long-Does-It-Take-for-Sod-to-Take-Root.php

The Best Grass For Arizona Lawns

For the warm seasons, the best types of grass for Arizona lawns are Bermuda grasses, such as Tifway, Midiron and others. Palmetto St. Augustine is also a great choice for warm seasons, as it is the most heat-tolerant of all St. Augustine cultivars. For winter grass, the best option is perennial ryegrass. You want to over-seed your summer lawn with perennial ryegrass in the fall when the temperatures outside start to drop to ensure a lush, green winter lawn.

Learn more here: https://www.evergreenturf.com/best-grass-arizona-lawns.php

How To Make St. Augustine Grass Thicker

In a nutshell, you want to follow these five steps to make St. Augustine grass thicker:

  1. Properly prepare the soil.
  2. Water sufficiently – the watering schedule varies based on whether you’re working with a freshly installed lawn or a mature lawn, as well as time of year.
  3. Mow the lawn to the proper height, make sure your mower has sharp blades, and don’t bag the trimmings.
  4. Fertilize with one pound of nitrogen per 1,000 square feet of lawn space. Fertilize during periods of active growth only.
  5. Hand pull weeds whenever possible, and be very careful if you choose to use chemical herbicides.

Learn more here: https://www.evergreenturf.com/how-to-make-st-augustine-grass-thicker.php

How To Keep Grass Green in Five Steps

  1. Choose a type of sod that will work best in your yard.
  2. Test your soil.
  3. Water thoroughly but do not over-water.
  4. Don’t mow too short.
  5. Aerate your lawn once in spring and once in fall.

Learn more here: https://www.evergreenturf.com/How-to-Keep-Grass-Green-in-5-Easy-Steps.php

How To Have Year-Round Grass in Arizona

Bermuda grass is used most often for Arizona lawns during the warm months. It will stay green and continue to grow as long as it has enough water. It is a perennial grass, meaning it comes back year after year. Its active season is usually from May to September.

In September or October, when the temperatures start to get cooler, Bermuda grasses will begin to turn yellow. While your lawn may look dead, it actually is not, this just means the grass has gone dormant.

If you want to ensure that your lawn is green from October through May until the Bermuda grass becomes active again, you will want to overseed your lawn with Rye grass. This grass is suited to cooler temperatures and will begin to die off in May once the afternoons start to become hotter.

Learn more here: https://www.evergreenturf.com/how-to-have-year-round-grass-arizona.php

Why and When To Fertilize Your Lawn

Why should you fertilize your lawn? Because fertilizers help to build a better root system, which in turn helps protect your lawn from extreme heat, cold, drought, foot traffic, and other stress factors.

When should you fertilize your lawn? You should fertilize several times throughout the year:

  • February – April – Strengthens the roots and helps to set it up for success during the heavy growing season.
  • April – June – Gives your lawn the energy it needs to stay healthy during the summer and fall.
  • June – August – Encourage continued growth so that you still have a lawn in the fall.
  • September – November – Your lawn is ready for another growth period, and will need nutrients in order to thrive. Apply your fertilizer just before the winter chill hits in order to increase nitrogen storage.

Learn more here: https://www.evergreenturf.com/Why-and-When-to-Fertilize-Your-Lawn.php

The Best Time To Install Your Arizona Sod Lawn

Sod can be installed year round as long as the soil is properly prepared beforehand.

Learn more here: https://www.evergreenturf.com/Best-Time-Install-Arizona-Sod-Lawn.php

A Guide To 15-15-15 Fertilizer

5-15-15 fertilizer is a fertilizer that contains equal parts of nitrogen, phosphorous, and potassium. It is the best option when you’re installing new sod in Arizona because the soil in Arizona naturally has little to no phosphorous content.

Learn more here: https://www.evergreenturf.com/15-15-15-fertilizer-guide-arizona.php

Best Watering Practices for Arizona Sod

  • When to water freshly installed sod: For the first two weeks after you install your new sod, you should water it four to eight times per day in short intervals of five to ten minutes to keep the sod evenly moist.
  • Water an established lawn two to three times per week for ten to 25 minutes. Try to water early in the morning or in the evening.
  • Rainwater and recycled household water can supplement your traditional water supply. Check your local laws to ensure it is legal to do so.
  • Sprinklers and timers can help make watering sod in Arizona more efficient.

Learn more here: https://www.evergreenturf.com/best-watering-practices-arizona-sod.php

How to Maintain Grass in Extreme Heat

Monday, July 2nd, 2018

Newsflash! It gets pretty toasty in Arizona in the summer!

Phoenix is always making national headlines around this time of year due to its extreme summer heat. This can be problematic for your sod lawn if you don’t know how to maintain your grass when temperatures soar.

Lucky for you, Evergreen Turf is here to help! Here are our top tips for maintaining grass through the hot Arizona summer heat:

Signs of Lawn Iron Deficiency - When it comes to leaves, you can detect iron deficiencies in a yellowish exterior with a green center.

1. Don’t Mow too Low

Mowing your grass too short reduces the plant’s ability to produce energy for growth. Remember, different varieties of grass have different growth habits that directly relate to mowing heights. Optimal mower heights vary, depending on whether you’re mowing cool-season or warm-season grass, but generally speaking, you never want to remove more than one-third of the grass blade at a time.

2. Water Deeply, Not Daily

Water is a scarce resource when things heat up in the desert, but you don’t want to drown your grass and waste the resource on a lawn that won’t be able to soak it all in. The goal is to water deeply so the water reaches the entire root zone. Then, don’t water again until it starts to dry out. Normally, you’ll be able to simply look at your lawn to see if it’s dry. If you’re not sure, use a soil probe or long screwdriver to test the moisture level beneath the surface. If you can’t push your tool down about ten inches, it’s time for a watering session.

3. Keep Mower Blades Sharp

Your grass will heal faster when you use a sharp blade. Dull blades tend to inhibit growth and may negate the beautiful look you’re going for. When the mower blade is dull, it rips the grass, rather than cutting it. This can lead to a brown appearance, as the tearing tends to deaden the tips of the leaves.

It’s important to keep your lawn healthy all year round to prevent headaches and costly mistakes that can be detrimental to the look of your yard.

Evergreen Turf is Arizona’s go-to place for beautiful lawns. If you follow these tips to maintain your healthy lawn during extreme summer heat in Phoenix and Tucson, you’ll enjoy a stunning lawn all summer long. Do you need a little help getting started? Touch base with our Evergreen Turf team today!

How To Transition Your Lawn Back To Warm Season Turfgrass

Thursday, March 22nd, 2018

Naturally, now that the chilly season is on its way out, you’re ready to get your green summer lawn going. If you overseeded properly in the fall, you enjoyed a lush green lawn all winter long. Soon, however, temperatures will begin to rise, putting those cool-weather blades into dormancy, allowing your warm-season grass to usher in an entirely new look. Spring is the time when you transition your lawn from winter to summer.

Here’s what you need to know about the springtime transition:

Spring Transition

arizona sod- how to fix soil

Wilting or Brown Spots Don’t Necessarily Signify a Need for Water

If you’re currently looking at a winter lawn, the brown spots and wilting aren’t likely the result of a lack of water. Instead, you probably planted winter grass that isn’t meant to survive Arizona’s harsh summer conditions. If this is the case, you don’t want to nurture your ryegrass. Instead, you want to make sure your Bermuda grass is healthy and well cared for, so it can carry out the summer months.

When to Transition to Summer Grass

There is no hard-and-fast date because temperatures can vary from year to year. You’re looking for a time-frame in which night time temperatures are consistently above 65 degrees at least five days in a row.

1. Don’t Over-Mow

Lower your mower height so you gradually remove about 1/2 the blade. The open canopy you create will give the roots more access to the sun, allowing heat to reach the soil surface uninterrupted. This allows the root system to start making its moves through the soil.

2. Aerate

Since nutrients are essential to your new lawn’s roots, it’s best to eliminate as many obstacles as possible. Aeration removes excess thatch and other obstacles that can prevent water and heat from reaching your lawn’s roots. Aeration is your way of telling your Bermuda grass it’s time to wake up and get going! As a note, you shouldn’t aerate until May.

RelatedHow to Prevent Disease and Insects in Your Lawn

3. Don’t Over-Water

You don’t need to cut back on watering completely, but you do want to give your summer grass room to surface. Cut back on water for about five days to discourage ryegrass from continuing growth. The Bermuda will take over when the ryegrass starts to show signs of distress.

4. Find the Right Fertilizer

Fertilizer is key, but many people don’t understand the differences between the available options. When you’re transitioning from winter to summer grass in Arizona, you want to use a fertilizer that’s high in ammonium sulfate. This helps weaken the ryegrass, while simultaneously supplying your Bermuda grass with the nutrients it needs to begin growing.

5. Keep Your Yard Raked

As your ryegrass dies out, it’s important to keep your lawn cleared of all dead plant material. Make best friends with your rake; this will provide a clean slate that will allow your Bermuda grass to grow without interruptions.

Are you ready to make your lawn everything you’ve ever dreamed it can be? Check out our Evergreen Turf Guide to Transitioning Your Arizona Sod Lawn – Spring Edition to find out everything you need to know to keep those leaves green and happy!

 

Winter Weeds to Know + Weed Control Tips

Tuesday, October 24th, 2017

During winter in Arizona, your lawn undergoes a number of changes. If you do not overseed your lawn, it turns brown as it goes dormant, and those pesky weeds pop up throughout your backyard. If you have an overseeded lawn, the weeds still come through, turning your luscious green winter lawn into an eyesore.

How did the weeds get there? Most of them started germinating during fall, turn brown in winter, and continue to blossom. The presence of the pesky and ugly winter weeds also means the health of your lawn is wanting as the weak turf allows the weeds to flourish.

Winter weeds are an eyesore and ruin the aesthetic appeal of your yard.

Winter Weed Control Tips

The best time to control the weeds is in the end of summer or beginning of fall. Follow the winter weed control tips below, depending on whether your lawn is overseeded or not.

Non-overseeded Lawns

If you have a non-overseeded lawn, the recommended approach is using pre-emergent herbicides. For best results spray the herbicides mid-September and it stops all weeds from even germinating.

Overseeded Lawns

First, about three weeks before overseeding your lawn, you want to kill any existing weeds. You can spray herbicides or pull them out. Once you have overseeded your lawn, DO NOT spray any herbicides for at least six weeks. The herbicide will damage the new rye grass that is growing in for the winter.

The use of pre-emergent sprays is recommended while the weeds are small. It’s important to identify the kinds of weeds plaguing your lawn, as different weeds require different approaches.

  • Grass weeds- They resemble grass, and they branch out than grow up through the soil.
  • Broadleaf weeds-they have broad leaves, flowers, are small and have tap roots.
  • Sedges-They come from tubers, roots, and seeds that branch out. They grower higher than the normal grass

After identifying the weeds, you can decide on the right approach which includes:

  • Using post and pre-emergent herbicides
  • Hand-pulling the weed

When dealing with herbicides, consider the following:

  • Recommended air temperature is between 66-85 degrees F. Using it a higher temperature damages the turf too.
  • Ensure the soil is moist so that the herbicide seeps into the root system
  • Do not mow before or after the treatment
  • Do not spray during the rainy or windy days, and on newly planted lawns

Common Winter Weeds

Poa annua is one of the common winter weeds in Arizona that appears in January and February. Poa annua germinates together with the ryegrass and only becomes visible in January when its seed heads start showing.

It ruins the aesthetic appeal of your lawn and you cannot spray it since it damages the ryegrass too.

Strategies to control the weed include:

  • Controlling it during germination by using pre-emergence herbicides or wait for it emerge and use post-emergence herbicides
  • Control its growth in non-overseeded sods using pre or post-emergence herbicides

We all want a lush, beautiful and a healthy lawn. Winter weeds are an eyesore and ruin the aesthetic appeal of your yard. It is important to understand the different kinds of weeds, when they emerge and, how to control them.

If you need sod in Arizona, contact Evergreen Turf today. We are Arizona’s premier sod supplier. We serve the following areas: Phoenix, Tucson, Chandler, Mesa, Yuma, Queen Creek, Casa Grande, Paradise Valley, Scottsdale, Tempe, Buckeye, Gilbert, Surprise, Sierra Vista, Apache Junction, Glendale, and Peoria.