Archive for the ‘Residential Arizona Sod’ Category

6 Easy Ways To Make Your Backyard Fun For Kids

Friday, January 13th, 2017

Entertaining your children needn’t cost an arm and a leg. Create a fun and safe backyard space for kids with the following DIY tips.

6 Easy Ways To Make Your Backyard Fun For Kids

Build a ground-level trampoline

As a safer, prettier alternative to a standard above-ground trampoline, consider one that lays flush with the ground. All Things Thrifty offers a helpful tutorial for building one yourself for less than $300 and a handful of supplies outside of your normal tool and garden kit. If you have a pool, build your ground level trampoline along the perimeter to serve as a second diving board.

Make a mud kitchen

Kids are happiest when they’re dirty! Let their creativity take center stage by providing tools for digging, molding, and shaping. Think of your backyard as an urban beach with mini shovels, buckets, tools, and more. Encourage your child to create “foods” such as mud pies as they experiment with Mother Nature’s materials including water to alternate the consistency of the messy medium.

Teach them how to grow

No, not emotionally—although that’s important too. Rather, learn how to grow food alongside your little one with a simple DIY garden bed. Whether you’re using individual potted plants for simple herbs or a fully converted sandbox, it’s easy to get kids excited about the idea of looking after a living thing. Tending to a home garden is also a great opportunity to teach your children about balanced nutrition and frugality.

Make a sand pit

Like the mud kitchen, a DIY sand pit will provide hours of entertainment for young ones who simply want to navigate the world around them on the ground floor. Build an easy teepee above a sand pit out of 2x4s for supervised climbing or add outdoor cushions around the edges to make the pit adult-friendly. Buckets, rope, toy cars, oversized rocks and sticks—the more “tools” the better.

Turn an outdoor fence into a chalkboard

Hey There, Home has an easy-to-follow tutorial for creating an outdoor chalkboard that will last for years to come. With a few supplies from your local hardware store you can have a canvas for the kids and their wildest creations.

Make a music wall

Get your children interested in music at an early age with household materials like old pots, bikes wheels or tire coverings—anything you can think of! There are no rules to a music wall other than ensuring your instruments are securely fastened with a nail or hook. Let your children make unique sounds with a worn out spatula or wooden spoon. The best part is sitting back and watching them explore with little to no instruction.

Any great backyard transformation doesn’t happen in a day. Start with one or two projects that seem most manageable and get the kids involved. Ask them to practice their writing skills by making a supply list or assign roles like “Best Assistant” and “Lead Painter.” Low cost backyard fun is right around the corner.

History of Sod – Sod Houses

Friday, December 16th, 2016

When people think back on the olden days, everybody pictures the log cabins that appear as part of America’s history in some of the oldest photos available. While it’s true that trees did serve as the home retreat for many settlers during our country’s infancy, another of Mother Nature’s materials was also widely used among pioneer families to make homes: Sod.

The History of Sod - Sod Houses | Evergreen Turf: Arizona's Premier Sod Supplier

Bark and branches were fantastic when they were available, but not every part of our country had access to ample amounts of trees. In fact, there were areas where people could go for miles upon miles without spotting a single tree. As settlers traveled across the plains and prairies of the central and western United States, they were forced to get a bit more creative with their natural resources. In these barren lands where the idea of forests was purely fictional, homesteaders turned to the ground beneath their feet to build roofs over their heads.

How Sod Homes Were Made

It all started with the strong, intricate root systems of plains grass. Holding the earth beneath them in their tight, compact grip, the roots served as a starting point for what would later become sod bricks. When the earth was soft and moist, particularly after a good rain in the summer or a spring thaw of melting snow, settlers would use ox-drawn sod cutters to plow the land and break up the earth. These sod cutters were particularly designed to cut the clumps of dirt into long and narrow pieces. From this point, the settlers used axes to chop the strips into brick-sized pieces. Just as you would expect, these sod bricks were then stacked vertically, one by one, side by side, forming the walls of settlers’ sod homes.

Once the walls were constructed, the structures were usually topped with roofs made from interlaced twigs, hay, thin branches, or other readily-available natural resources. The final touch often included another layer of sod atop the twigs and branches as a finishing touch. It wasn’t uncommon to see sod homes built into the sides of hills or banks. This saves the settlers time and energy, as they could dig away the earth at the side of the incline, using the dug-outs to serve as portions of the homes’ walls and roofs.

Why Sod Homes Worked

For starters, any shelter is better than no shelter at all. Prairie grass and the surrounding sod was readily available in certain parts of the country, and it served its purpose in providing walls and a roof to those who needed them. Because sod was available in ample supply, these houses were cheap to make. Their earthen construction also worked well in accordance with seasonal temperature changes; they were often warm in the winter, and they usually stayed cool in the summer months.

Why Sod Homes Didn’t Work

Alas, you’re not likely to look around and see tons of sod homes as you’re driving to and from work these days. As it turns out, sod homes had some significant deficits, despite doing their best to keep settlers warm, safe, and dry. Of course, being that these homes were made completely of grass and dirt, snakes, mice, and other critters saw no problem calling these houses their homes. Rattlesnakes were known to move in and become unwelcome roommates, and there wasn’t much the settlers could do about it.

These earthen structures were also susceptible to the elements. Leaky roofs were quite common, if not completely expected. Once water found its way into the homes, the dirt floors became muddy messes. Naturally, the sod that comprised the roofs, when wet, became quite heavy as well. Collapses and cave-ins were common in the days after big rains, as the layers of earth took days to dry out, and the structures weren’t often sturdy enough to withstand the heavy sod tops.

All in all, sod homes did their duties until something better was able to be built. Although they certainly weren’t meant to last for lifetimes, America’s early settlers learned to love sod in their own rights and rely on this great material that our Arizona Turf team prides itself on today.

Did our story about sod houses and settlers teach you something new about our country’s history? We’d love to hear your thoughts at our Evergreen Turf Facebook page!

4 Fun and Easy Landscaping Ideas For Your Front Yard

Friday, December 16th, 2016

Looking to spruce up your front yard? Curb appeal isn’t just a real estate term – every homeowner should enjoy the look of their most valuable asset. Draw inspiration from Pinterest and give your yard the makeover you’ve been wanting for years. Here are four fun and easy landscaping ideas for your front yard.

4 Fun and Easy Landscaping Ideas For Your Front Yard

Mid-Century Modern

Nothing alludes to a good mid-century vibe quite like clean lines and simple aesthetics. Even if your home’s interior doesn’t match, opt for a 1950s landscape by laying large square cement pavers. Fill in the spaces with rock and/or grass.

Other tips:

Add a small vintage bistro set on the patio to tie the look together—a small bench or powder coated metal chair will work well too. Flamingo lawn ornaments could lend a playful, welcoming element to your walkway.

The Warmest Welcome

Don’t shy away from using doorway décor to get your message across. Do you host frequently? Have a large collection of trinkets in the home? Take that cozy vibe outdoors with a welcome sign or seasonal flag. DIY signs look anything but cheap when you use a wood stain and carefully-applied stencils.

Other tips:

Add a few candles in a large glass vase or potted plants. Work with the changing seasons by adding a pop of color for spring and a pair of pumpkins in the fall. Sometimes replacing a worn out welcome mat is enough to give the porch a fresh face.

Next Level DIY

Ditch the high-maintenance flower beds in favor of a Do-It-Yourself walkway made from pallet boards. Hometalk shows you how it’s done:

  • First, clear the area you intend to use for the walkway. It may require some digging or the removal of existing plants and shrubs.
  • Next, dampen the ground and lay fresh soil so that it’s easy to work with around and between the pallets.
  • Lay the boards into the soil and pack well. Whether it’s curvy or straight, the important thing is to give the pathway a walk test to ensure it is smooth.
  • Add a coat of outdoor sealant. Not only will it add a bit of shine, it will help prevent rot and extend the longevity of your new walkway.

How to find free pallets:

Check your local businesses first. Large chain stores generally have specific processes for waste disposal and won’t part with extra wood. Scour garden shops or hardware stores—motorcycle shops too. Mind your manners and ask! A little kindness goes a long way.

Enhance Your Garden

The best makeovers are those that include the existing features of any given space. Does your front yard contain several trees? Make them pop with a circular enclosure—an easy way to incorporate a stunning focal point that would otherwise be lost in a sea of similar suburban homes. Start by laying flagstone wall blocks to form a circle around your plant of choice—staggering them as you would brick. No flagstone? Use large rocks instead. Fill in the circle with decorative rock or a vibrant flower bed.

Other tips:

Turn an eye-sore of a focal point into a jaw-dropper by placing faux hollow rocks over unsightly pipes and sprinklers. Elevate your garden by making a raised flowerbed along the path that leads to your front door. All it takes is one or two small projects to completely transform your home’s exterior.

For more inspiration, visit Pinterest and peruse additional front yard landscaping ideas. Design a yard that makes you proud to call your house a home – one that will stand above the rest.

How to Attract Bees to Your Yard

Tuesday, November 1st, 2016

Bees are beneficial in many ways, which is exactly why you should consider attracting more bees to your own yard. Intrigued?  Read on to learn more about the importance of bees, and how to attract bees to your yard!

arizona sod

Why Are Bees Important?

From the pretty petals you like to pick up and smell to the fruits and veggies that are the root of your home garden, many of the plants you encounter on a daily basis needed a little help getting going.

Pollination is the process whereby pollen is transferred from the male part of the flower (the stamen) to the female part (the stigma).  When boy meets girl, seedlings begin to grow.  Sounds simple enough, right?  Because these two parts of the flower don’t connect naturally, the pollen needs a little help getting from one spot to the other.  This is where bees come into play.

When bees stop by to smell the roses (or any other flower), the plant’s pollen collects on the body of the bee.  As the bee wanders around the petals, the pollen falls of its body, distributing this seed-creating substance from the stamen to the stigma.  There are literally dozens of foods and plants we may not ever even know about if it weren’t for the handy assistance of bees helping to pollenate the flowers.

Why Are Bees in Danger?

Over the last decade or so, a few bee scares have hit the headlines.  On a number of occurrences, massive numbers of bees died seemingly simultaneously, causing widespread alarm, if not panic, in parts of the country.

As it turns out, the death of bee populations doesn’t necessarily signify the end of the world, but it does raise a red flag of awareness.  MSNBC explored Why we can’t stop panicking about the honeybees last year in an interesting article that explores the recent spike in bee deaths.

In the end, it seems bees’ lives changed dramatically when they became commercialized worker bees, so to speak.  Once upon a time, bees could frolic and pollinate small, organic, diverse fields to their hearts’ content.  In today’s world, they’re exposed to plenty of chemicals and pesticides; meanwhile, their natural habitats are diminishing.

How to Welcome Bees into Your Yard

Ready to create a buzzworthy habitat for your favorite pollinating property guests?  It doesn’t take a ton of work to welcome bees into your yard, but you’ll likely notice a big change in your ecosystem’s happiness shortly.  Foods and plants that produce flowers will roll out the red carpet for your stinger-wielding, winged friends.

Consider planting these flowers and plants:

  • In the Garden: Peas, squash, eggplant, broccoli, cucumbers, watermelons, and pumpkins
  • Around the Yard: Pear, plum, and apple trees
  • Sweet Finishes: Raspberries, blackberries, and gooseberries

Use chemical-free pesticides.  As we discussed, chemicals and pesticides have been major contributors to the decline of bee populations.  Chemical-free plants equal happy bees, so go organic, and stick to a more natural way of life.  Your bees will thank you.

Make a Bee Shelter.  Bee pots are easy to make, and they provide great refuge for hardworking pollinators.  Start with a small clay pot and a small lump of garden moss to cover the drainage hole.  Fill the rest of the pot loosely with hay, then place the pot upside down in a warm, sheltered spot in your yard or garden.  Bury half the pot underground to keep it from going anywhere.  The moss will shift down once the pot is upside down, allowing just enough space for the bees to come and go.

If you’re feeling super crafty, try making a mason bee house.

Have you been successful at bringing bees to your yard?  We’d love to hear about it!  Please share your bee stories and photos at our Evergreen Turf Facebook page!

The 5 Best Arizona Climbing Plants for Your Backyard

Tuesday, November 1st, 2016

There are many types of Arizona climbing plants you can use on your backyard pergola or outdoor wall. These vines add a unique beauty to virtually any landscape, without needing much water – a huge bonus for homeowners in the Arizona desert.

arizona sod

Here are the 5 best Arizona climbing plants for your backyard:

Rose

Botanical Name: Rosa banksiae 
Common Name: Lady Banks’ Rose

This beautiful plant can also withstand temps as low as 10 degrees Fahrenheit. It thrives in full sun and requires moderate water. It grows fast and can grow as tall as 20 feet high and 15 feet wide.

Honeysuckle

Botanical Name: Tecomaria capensis
Common Name: Cape Honeysuckle

Not quite as hardy as the rose, the honeysuckle can withstand temps down to 28 degrees Fahrenheit. It loves full and partial sun and requires moderate watering to stay healthy. It’s significantly smaller than the rose plant, growing to a max of 6′ height X 5′ width.

Primrose Jasmine

Botanical Name: Jasminum mesnyi
Common Name: Primrose Jasmine

This sprawling plant blooms with gorgeous yellow flowers during late winter through spring. Not that it’s relevant to the Arizona desert, but the plant can live in temps as low as 15 degrees Fahrenheit. It does best in partial and full sun, and require moderate watering. With a max growth of 10’ height x 6’ wide, it made our list of the best climbing plants to use in Arizona backyards.

Trumpet Vine

Botanical Name: Podranea ricasoliana 
Common Name: Pink Trumpet Vine

The pink trumpet vine survives in cold weather down to 25 degrees Fahrenheit but thrives in full sun as well as partial sun, and require low watering. It grows tall, up to 20’ height x 10’ width. The flowers bloom in late summer to fall and have a wonderful fragrance.

Bougainvillea

Botanical Name: Bougainvillea spectabilis 
Common Name: Bougainvillea

This may be one of the most well-known climbing plants in Arizona as it’s a popular choice for homeowners and business owners alike. It can survive in temps as low as 28 degrees Fahrenheit and loves full sun or reflected sun. The reason it’s so often chosen among people in Arizona is not just its beautiful flowers but its ability to thrive with low water. It’s an added bonus that the flowers can bloom year-round, weather permitting.

So there you have it! Our top 5 picks for the best Arizona climbing plants.

Need sod for your Arizona home or business? Contact us today.

Unique Sod Lawn Landscaping Ideas

Tuesday, September 27th, 2016

Want a grass lawn that stands out from your neighbors’ front yards? There are plenty of ways to play up your yard! Here are some ideas we have to help you take a standard sod lawn to the next level with some unique landscaping ideas:

King Me.

Unique Sod Lawn Landscaping Ideas

Your home is your palace, and your yard is a place where you should feel like royalty every time you step onto your lawn.  Create a checkered pattern that’s marked by sod and stone or tile to elevate your outdoor experience.

A checkered pattern alone sounds like a pretty simple concept, but there are plenty of complex lawn projects that take the idea of checker boards to the next level.  You are afforded the ability to create a checkered lawn that’s as simple or complicated as you wish, and your guests are sure to appreciate any of the artful avenues you choose to use.

Layer Up.

Take dimension to a new level by layering up with steps made of steel.  Just as vertical storage inside your house can create additional space and enhance the illusion of a place, making it bigger than it really is, a layered lawn can offer a tiered presentation of an otherwise ordinary space.

Layering techniques are often excellent ways to balance bulky items that can be focal points on the property.  If you have a big tree on one side of the yard, a layered design might be the perfect way to balance that element and create an easy-to-view curb appeal that plays to its own landscape aesthetics.

Find Your Focus

Your lawn doesn’t have to be all about sod!  Just like a great paint job can be perfectly accented by just the right front door on your house, a beautiful lawn can easily be enhanced with the right decorative items.  Create a focal point in your yard that will serve as a conversation and compliment piece when visitors stop by.

Fire

 

The great thing about most focal points that belong on the lawn is that you can create your own if you feel like embarking on a DIY project.  Otherwise, there are plenty of store-bought options that will make exceptional yard accessories.

Great lawn-worthy focal points that you might want to consider adding your yard could include

  • A fire pit
  • An outdoor room
  • A water feature

If you want a lawn that makes people pay attention, beautiful grass is just the beginning.  A little creativity and out-of-the-box thinking when it comes to your blades can completely change the personality of your property.  There are plenty of ideas you probably have never even thought about.  Take some time to peruse the internet for interesting ideas, and when you’ve compiled some inspirational items, contact sod professionals.

At Evergreen Turf, we love the idea of a new challenge that involves a little lawn creativity!  As Arizona’s premier sod producer, we’ve had our hand in some great projects.  Check out our slideshow to see a few examples!

Tips & Ideas For Adding Style To Your Outdoor Wall

Tuesday, September 27th, 2016

Planning a makeover for either your front yard, back yard or patio? Once you’ve ordered and installed some fresh sod in your lawn, it’s time to fix up the rest of the outdoor space! Here are some ideas on how to jazz up your outdoor walls.

Outdoor Wall Décor

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Use outdoor wall décor to bring some style to your walls. You can find these at practically any home and garden décor store, big-box retail store or online. They are typically made with metal materials to prevent damage from mother-nature.

You can even change out your wall décor with the seasons, or get a custom-made wall décor.  As an example, your last name or something similar that is personal to your family or home.

Crawling Plants

Get some plants that crawl up the wall, such as creeping rosemary. Other crawling plants that are adapted to the Arizona desert include:

  • Bougainvillea
  • Cape honeysuckle
  • Baja passion vine
  • Cat claw vine
  • Grape ivy
  • Pink / Purple trumpet vine
  • Lilac vine
  • Asian Jasmine
  • Creeping fig
  • Potato vine
  • Sky flower

Water-Wise Landscaping

When fixing up the area around your outdoor wall, it’s always important, especially here in Arizona, to think about how much water each plant species needs. Rather than planting things that need lots of water, plant native species like succulents to keep your water use to a minimum. Beyond succulents, find plants that speak to you. Consider some lavender or purple sage to bring pops of color to your space.

Final Tips

If you’re feeling like you need more outdoor wall ideas, check websites like Pinterest and Houzz for further inspiration.

If you need sod in Arizona, we service greater Phoenix, Tucson and many surrounding areas. Call us or order online today to get fresh sod for your yard.

In conclusion, remember to take the time to decorate your outdoor wall in a way that highlights your own style preferences and personality. At the same time, choose native species and be aware of how much water each plant needs. Have fun with your creation process!

Differences Between Bermuda Grass and St Augustine Grass

Wednesday, August 24th, 2016

When it comes to grass, there are plenty of factors that go into choosing the right blades for your backyard.  Bermuda and St. Augustine grasses are common choices, but these two types of grass have several distinctive differences, which can make one a better option for your yard than the other.

bermuda grass vs st augustine

Here’s a quick guide to help you better understand the differences between Bermuda grass and St. Augustine Grass:

Water

In the turf wars between Bermuda grass and St. Augustine Grass, Bermuda grass takes the trophy.  St. Augustine tends to get a little greedy when it comes to water consumption, soaking up as much as twice the amount of moisture it takes to keep its Bermuda Grass counterpart happy.

Since Arizona is such a hot, dry climate, water conservation is often at the top of homeowners’ lists when they’re shopping for new grass.  There are many elements you should consider before you decide on the right blades of grass for your new lawn; if water conservation is on your list, it’s important to know which species are the thirstiest.

Temperature

Both Bermuda grass and St. Augustine grass tend to do well in hot climates.  When the temperature drops below 60o, both grasses become a bit temperamental.  St. Augustine is a little more volatile than Bermuda grass in chillier weather, which can leave it vulnerable to pests and diseases.

Thankfully, in the Phoenix area, we’re not faced with chilly weather often, so either grass tends to withstand our temperatures quite well.]

Related: Summer Health for Arizona Sod

Growth

When it comes to growth, the differences between Bermuda grass and St. Augustine Grass largely lie in personal preference.  Bermuda grass will take off aggressively once it’s established.  As it expands its territory, it will require frequent trimming (particularly along driveways, sidewalks, and gardens.)  Keeping up on trimming tasks will help to prevent this grass from taking over turf beyond its own terrain.

Soil Requirements

St. Augustine grass tends to be lower maintenance in terms of soil requirements.  It requires about the same amount of potassium as other grasses and has low phosphorous needs.  Fertilizing with nitrogen every couple months will help St. Augustine grass survive any strange cold spells we may experience in winter here in Arizona and help it bounce back in the spring.  Bear in mind that this grass does suffer without sufficient iron in the soil, so it’s imperative that you use the best fertilizer for St. Augustine Grass to ensure that it’s getting its proper nutrients.

Bermuda grass can be a little needier in terms of fertilization requirements.  It will have a higher nitrogen requirement that other grasses.  Depending on the strain of Bermuda grass you choose, the turf, and the desired appearance, it may also require special attention to other elements, as well.

Sun vs Shade

If you’re lucky enough to have ample shade, you might lean towards St. Augustine Grass, as Bermuda grass doesn’t grow at its best without direct sunlight.  Bermuda grass is much happier with constant exposure to the sun.

Traffic

The traffic element is very much an element dictated by your own personal use.  Bermuda grass is resilient and handles being trampled on quite well.  It’s a great grass if you’ll have a lot of human activity on your lawn.  St. Augustine Grass, on the other hand, isn’t a fan of high traffic; it does much better being left alone.

There are plenty of factors that go into determining the right grass for each person’s needs.  If you’re still not sure about the differences between Bermuda Grass and St. Augustine Grass, our team at Evergreen Turf is here and happy to help!  Contact us with your questions, and we’ll be glad to give you some answers!

How To Keep Your Lawn From Drying Out This Summer

Wednesday, July 20th, 2016

There’s nothing worse than investing time and money into your dream yard only to see the grass wilt and dry out. Save yourself the frustration by learning how to properly care for your Arizona grass. With scorching summers and annual monsoons, it’s difficult to get things right the first time – but not impossible.

green blades of grass, up close - featured image - how to ensure your lawn does not dry out this summer - blog post

Commit yourself to research

Whether you’re installing fresh sod in Arizona or rehabilitating a dried out lawn inherited from prior homeowners, the first thing you should do is research the best grass and how to care for it. Take into account the soil’s pH level, shade to sunlight ratio, surrounding plant life, and your personal commitment to maintenance. Talk to neighbors whose lawns you love and ask what problems they’ve faced. A well-kept lawn does not happen by accident so it’s important to know what species is likely to thrive in your region and how much time and money you have to ensure its success.

Opt for sod over seed

Heat is a major inhibitor of healthy growth as watering can lead to nearly-instant evaporation. Seeds often require significant time to form strong roots unless you’re prepared to be diligent about watering and reseeding annually. Sod is a good choice for Arizona homeowners as its even easier to grow and maintain than starting with grass seeds for several reasons:

  • Installing sod in Arizona is a “one and done” solution to a bare lawn. Simply prepare the soil and install sod the same day it arrives.
  • Although seeding is less expensive than sod, that might not be the case in the long run if you’re forced to reseed annually and pay more for maintenance services.
  • Sod is more resistant to weeds as there is less room for the seeds to settle and germinate.
  • Sod is less likely to dry out. This is because seeds initially need to be watered several times per day to prevent dry soil. Although sod also needs moisture to become firmly rooted, the watering schedule is less demanding and decreases in frequency much earlier in the rooting process.
  • Laying sod in Arizona is perhaps most advantageous for its instant curb appeal. This is appealing to both new homeowners eager to enjoy their lawn and those looking to put their home on the market quickly.

Know how to maintain sod in Arizona

Once you’ve committed to installing sod, heed the most common tips and tricks for avoiding a dry, stressed out lawn.

  1. Stay off the sod. Constant foot traffic from children and pets places unnecessary strain on new grass that is trying to form a healthy root system.
  2. Restrict your dog to one specific area of the yard to do his business. If you can help it, try to avoid the grass completely and train him to relieve himself on the pavement (which can easily be sprayed down) or rock landscaping.
  3. Prevent over fertilization by taking the proper precautions.
  4. Closely adhere to the watering schedule of your specific sod type. Remember: the dry Arizona heat speeds up evaporation, so be mindful of the frequency and depth of watering.
  5. Water early with evenly spaced sprinklers to avoid midday evaporation and fungal diseases caused by wet grass that festers in cool temperatures overnight.
  6. Mow only at the recommended height for your particular sod and leave the clippings throughout the yard to aid water absorption.

For an estimate to install sod in Arizona or for a professional guide to preventing dry patches, contact a sod specialist at 480-456-1199.

How To Get Rid of Weeds – For Good!

Wednesday, July 20th, 2016

Want to finally learn how to get rid of weeds in grass? You’re not alone. Harsh Arizona temperatures present the perfect opportunity for weed growth throughout an otherwise healthy lawn. Learn how to combat these pesky plants by knowing how to prevent and effectively remove weeds.

how to get rid of weeds in grass

What Causes Weeds to Grow

You might be doing everything right to maintain your lawn, yet still find yourself fighting weeds every month like clockwork. Keep in mind, weeds are opportunistic and germinate the moment they’re exposed to a little rain and sun. Seeds will multiply as quickly as possible under optimal conditions, getting assistance from birds, rodents, rain runoff, and wind. Even the laborious act of pulling weeds may cause seeds to spread.

Common Weeds in Arizona

In learning how to get rid of weeds in grass, it’s imperative you know the species. Different types of weeds require different methods of eradication. Common Arizona weeds are:

  • Spotted Spurge
  • Filaree
  • Common Mallow
  • Nutgrass
  • London Rocket

How to Get Rid of Weeds in Grass

Again, weeds are resourceful and very resilient, so understand that weed control won’t likely be a one-time occurrence. The Family Handyman gives you six practical solutions to weed control.

  1. Maintain your turf

Don’t give seeds the sunlight they need to grow. Keep your lawn cut to the recommended height based on sod type. Grass that is properly fertilized and watered at the ideal height will provide enough shade to outperform weeds.

  1. Know your weeds

The three main categories of weeds are annual grassy weeds (e.g. crab grass), perennial grassy weeds (e.g. quack grass), and broadleaf weeds (e.g. ground ivy). Each type requires the appropriate product, application method, and frequency of treatment.

  1. Control broadleaf weeds

Use a broadleaf herbicide and distribute it with the smallest possible applicator. To control sporadic weeds, spot treat them with a small pressure sprayer. Weed patches need a 1-2 gallon tank sprayer. Lastly, bring in a dial sprayer when your lawn has succumbed to uncontrollable weeds.

  1. Control perennial weeds

Because perennial grasses typically return year after year due to strong underground root systems, it’s not enough to simply pull them. Nonselective weed killers like Roundup will solve the weed problem but create another one—they will kill all plant life including your Arizona sod. Instead, put a cloth glove over a rubber glove, dip your hand in herbicide, and coat the blades starting from the base and moving upward. Don’t worry about actually pulling the weeds or coating every last blade—your method should work within a few days.

  1. Control annual weeds

Perfect timing is crucial in preventing crab grass, so be sure to apply treatment between the first and third mow in the spring. If it still rears its ugly head, control crab grass by:

  • Hand-pulling clumps and reseeding bare spots as needed
  • Letting it go until next spring when you can once again try to time it correctly
  • Treating clumps with crab grass killer (note: if you wait until summer or fall, this method will not work as seed heads will have already formed)
  1. Know when to call it quits

Pessimism aside, poor conditions may mean that you’ll be forever fighting weeds, dead grass, and infestations. Consult a professional to consider if a complete resod might be a better option. If all else fails, you can always default to Arizona landscape trends: desert rocks with cacti or low-maintenance ground cover.

Call Evergreen Turf at 480-456-1199 for a free phone consultation to discuss existing lawn care problems and practical solutions to your weed-related woes.