What Is The Best Low Maintenance Grass For Arizona

March 3rd, 2017

Arizona is known for its sunshine, but the Grand Canyon State’s extreme highs and dry heat can make for a troublesome lawn should you choose the wrong grass. Opt for a low-maintenance yard by choosing Midiron or Palmetto St. Augustine grass. Here’s why.

What Is The Best Low Maintenance Grass For Arizona

About Palmetto St. Augustine

Palmetto St. Augustine is by far the most popular turf grass in the United States for its rich color and fine texture. It has the ability to withstand extreme cold but also thrives under the sky high temperatures of the Arizona desert. In fact, it performs best in heat. What follows are the main characteristics of Palmetto St. Augustine.

Look and Feel

Color: Emerald/Green

Blade width: 8-9 mm

Function

Soil: Sand, Clay

Injury Recovery: Good

Insect Resistance: Average

Disease Resistance: Good

Maintenance

Mower: Standard

Blade height: 1.5 – 2.5 inches

Weed control: Good

About Midiron

Midiron is incredibly durable and drought-tolerant making it a popular choice among Arizona homeowners who don’t want to spend hours on weekly yard duties. It’s especially ideal for families as Midiron can withstand heavy foot traffic including that of the family pet or active child. It’s most commonly found on commercial properties but makes a great alternative to seed for residential lawns due to the following characteristics.

Look and Feel

Color: Green

Blade width: 3 mm

Function

Soil: Sand, Loam, Clay

Injury Recovery: Great

Insect Resistance: Great

Disease Resistance: Great

Maintenance

Mower: Rotary, Reel

Blade height: ¾ – 1.5 inch

Which Turf Grass is Better?

Because Midiron and Palmetto St. Augustine are both versatile and long lasting, the top pick for one’s lawn is mostly a matter of preference. Both grasses are soft to the touch for maximum comfort and resemblance to traditional grass types. There are few notable differences between the properties of these two low maintenance grasses.

  1. Midiron is not shade-tolerant meaning your Arizona lawn should not be hidden by large trees or covered patios. As the grass thrives under sunny conditions, desert landscaping is ideal. Think cacti and rock coverings around the lawn’s perimeter.
  2. Augustine prefers direct sunlight, but it will survive in shade just as well. Homeowners can expect slower growth in the cooler winter and spring seasons.
  3. Installing St. Augustine will necessitate more fertilizer than Midiron along with frequent mowing. Midiron typically needs fertilizer only one time per year—a blend of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium.
  4. Midiron will do well with a water soak every five days versus daily watering. St. Augustine does not need a lot of water either, though the maintenance schedule will vary slightly between the two.
  5. Midiron can withstand heavy wear while St. Augustine will require careful attention to extra foot traffic.

To determine which turf grass is right for you, check out our lawn selector tool.

How to Refresh Your Yard For Spring

March 2nd, 2017

Here are some tips and ideas on how to refresh your yard for spring.

  1. Update your welcome mats with bright colors
  2. Create sod-covered coasters
  3. Paint your planters bright colors
  4. Repair bare spots in your lawn
  5. Garnish Your Outdoor Space with DIY Garland

arizona sod spring refresh tips

Update Your Welcome Mats with Bright Colors

Out with the old, drab, gray mats that have greeted one too many pairs of dirty shoes. It’s time to freshen up your pad, starting with the space that greets guests just before they enter your doors. Need some inspiration? Shoot for fruit-inspired floor features that will liven up your entryways. A watermelon welcome mat at the front door, and a lemon one at the back, will instantly bring a bright and vibrant vibe to your home.

Create Sod-Covered Coasters

What’s a springtime cocktail without a great coaster? We’d be lying if we said we didn’t have a special affinity to these sod-covered coasters. After all, our Evergreen Turf team works hard to procure beautiful sod lawns everyday, so when we find an item that allows us to enjoy the fruits of our labor by way of an after-work cocktail, there’s no getting around the happiness!

Fill a glass with fruit-infused water – or go for something a little stronger – as you sit on your patio and enjoy the welcoming post-winter Arizona weather.

Paint Your Planters Bright Colors

Ring in spring by saying, “Out with the drab, and in with the fab!”

Nobody said planters have to keep their boring, original colors. Pep up your plants, both inside and out, with neon paint. Appeal to the complementary colors on your flowers’ petals, or simply choose vibrant hues that work well for you. In any case, a brightened up planter will instantly set the springtime mood.

Repair Bare Spots in Your Lawn

Now that winter has begun to fade away, this is the perfect time to fix any trouble spots in your lawn and repair bare spots with new sod. Brown spots can easily become green again if you put the proper measures in place. First, try to understand what’s causing the barren spaces on your landscape. If pet urine or pests are the problem, seek measures to help eliminate ongoing brown patches. Otherwise, new sod won’t do much but mask the problem as a momentary fix.

If you’ve remedied the sources of your spotting, it’s time to lay down some new sod. Be sure to check out our Guide to Transitioning Your Arizona Sod Lawn in the Spring for helpful tips about fertilizing, watering, and maintaining your new sod.

Garnish Your Outdoor Space with DIY Garland

You can spruce up any space in your place with an easy-to-do DIY garland project. Simply gather the essential items, and set some time aside to work on your craft. If you have a garden, consider plucking some of your lovely flowers to incorporate into this piece. Alternatively, local florists – and even grocery stores – will be able to provide you with plenty of floral pickings.

Alas, not all spring cleaning is this much fun. To ensure a beautiful Arizona lawn all summer long, be sure to check out these 5 Lawn Care Tips for Spring brought to you by our Evergreen Turf team!

Best Time to Lay Warm-Season Grass In Phoenix

March 1st, 2017

Taking care of your lawn is an important part of home ownership, but it’s not always easy – especially in the arid desert climate of Arizona. Some grasses do better than others in this region, and sometimes, timing is everything. If you’re laying fresh sod, however, practically anytime is a good time to lay your summer grass. You just need to make sure you take care of your lawn from beginning to end to ensure the best results.

arizona sod

Here are some things you should take into consideration:

Prep Properly For New Sod

It’s important to make sure the ground is properly prepared to ensure the soil will welcome your warm-season grass willfully. Your new grass will need a good amount of water, so you don’t want to under water, but you certainly don’t want to over water, either. You also need to ensure that you’re fertilizing appropriately to optimize growth.

If you’re uncertain how to prepare your lawn for warm-season grass, check out our how to install page.

Stay Patient With Dormant Lawns

If you had a warm season sod lawn last year, and you did not install a winter lawn, your summer lawn should grow back naturally as it comes out of dormancy. In this case, you should not need to lay new sod. Just stay patient, and wait for your beautiful green grass to begin growing again.

Overseeded Lawn – Do Maintenance

If you overseeded your lawn, you just have to perform a few maintenance tasks to get your summer lawn to come back this year. Take a look at our Spring Transition Guide for more help on the following:

  • Mowing your lawn at the right height – You’ll want to lower your mower so you remove approximately ½ the grass leaf blades. With easier access to light, the roots of your grass will receive heat, allowing them to wake up and begin growing.
  • Aerating your lawn – By putting small holes all over your lawn, you’ll invite heat to its root system, which also encourages grass to come out of dormancy.
  • Watering at optimal frequencies – You don’t want to stop watering completely, but it is important to cut back on watering during the spring lawn process. Ultimately, you’re trying to discourage growth of your winter ryegrass while encouraging your warm-weather Bermuda grass to make its springtime appearance.
  • Fertilizing with balanced ingredients – There are several different types of fertilizers, each of which is formulated with various amounts of essential minerals. If you choose the wrong fertilizer, you could set your lawn up for failure. However, the right formula will enhance the growth of your summer grass while further weakening your winter grass. As the ryegrass dies out, be sure to rake your lawn, allowing the Bermudagrass to have a clean canvass.

Still not sure how to make the most of your grass? Our Evergreen Turf team of professionals are experts at helping Arizona homeowners get ready for hot summers and beautiful lawns. Contact us, and let us know what we can do to help!

Arizona Lawn Care Tips for March

February 28th, 2017

While it comes as no surprise to homeowners who have installed sod, lush lawns are a labor intensive project. Being mindful of the seasons and their respective maintenance plans will facilitate healthy growth and thwart widespread disease. March is a great time to revisit your lawn care processes and adjust for the weather.

Arizona sod lawn care tips for spring

March Forecast

On average, Phoenix, Arizona, sees .9 inches of rain during the month of March. The average high is 75 degrees with an average low of 49. Temperatures will vary depending on your location within the valley, but seasonal averages can successfully guide you toward the right maintenance plan.

Sod Maintenance Tips for Spring

When spring is in the air, overwatering becomes the number one culprit of fungal infections. You should avoid mowing wet grass for the same reason as a problem confined to one area of the yard will soon spread throughout the entire lawn. Other weather-sensitive issues include:

  • Weeding: Summer is the worst time to try and tackle your weed problem since the roots will be well established and tough. Pre-emergent herbicides will save you days of labor and allow you to tackle the issue when weeds are soft and just beginning to grow.
  • Fertilizing: A quick spring fertilizer will prime your lawn for optimal growth throughout the season. The fertilizer you use will depend upon your particular sod type as well as any problems you may have faced during the winter months. The most important factor is finding the correct balance of essential nutrients conducive to Arizona’s climate.
  • Mowing: As discussed in a previous blog, the frequency and method of mowing will depend on your grass species and how quickly it’s growing. Always keep grass blades at 2/3 their height. As for frequency:
    • A Tifgreen sod lawn mowed below 1/2 of an inch may have to be mowed every 2-3 days.
    • A Midiron hybrid Bermuda sod lawn mowed at 2 inches may only have to be mowed once every 7-10 days.

Spring Gardening Tips

Once you’ve mastered sod care, it’s time to take full advantage of the season and enhance your beautiful yard even more. Spring is a great time to start a vegetable garden or grow your favorite flowers.

  • Best seeds: carrots, cucumbers, green onion, squash, peppers, tomatoes, melons, beets.
  • Best flowers: desert marigold, sunflower, safflower, verbena, cosmos, hollyhock.
  • Best herbs: basil, chamomile, sage, oregano, thyme, lemon grass, parsley, mint.
  • If you have citrus trees, remember to fertilize with nitrogen when they sprout leaves. Transplant new trees during this time as they’ll take approximately three years to produce fruit. A young tree (2-5 years old) will be easier to manage and yield fruit at the same time as an older tree.
  • For other landscape plants, don’t forget to water at least once a month in the absence of rainfall. Remove weeds early and often and prune the plants that are sensitive to frost once they leaf out.

By taking the time to properly care for your lawn, you’ll get to enjoy its beauty for years to come. Follow the recommended maintenance for your sod grass and—when in doubt—consult a professional to ensure its vibrancy and longevity.

How To Prevent Ticks In Your Yard

January 26th, 2017

When it comes to keeping ticks off your dog, prevention is key. Since ticks often live in the pet’s own yard, it’s important to keep up with a regular lawn maintenance routine. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provide general information on ticks as well as tips for keeping these nasty nuisances away.

how to prevent ticks in your yard

Understanding Ticks

Ticks belong to the arachnid family and are classified as ectoparasites that feed on the blood of mammals. Aside from latching on to their “host” and causing the animal discomfort, they can also carry diseases like Lyme disease, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, and Anaplasmosis. Contrary to popular belief, ticks don’t jump or fly; rather, they attach themselves to other animals when they’re alerted to the host’s presence through smells, vibrations, etc. One of the ways they do this is by waiting on long blades of grass with their legs outstretched, waiting to latch on to an unsuspecting pup.

Life Cycle of a Tick

While ticks often die after their inability to find a host, they can survive for years as they cycle through each of the four stages of life: egg, larva, nymph, and adult. Once a tick hatches from its egg, it requires blood for survival—be it from mammals, birds, or reptiles.

Lawn Care Tips for Avoiding Ticks

Not only will regular yard maintenance keep your lawn in pristine shape, upkeep will keep ticks away in every stage of their life cycle. Here’s how to protect your pet like a pro.

  • Mow regularly. The higher the blade, the easier it will be for ticks to reach your animal and latch on to start feeding.
  • Apply tick pesticides (called acaricides) to reduce the amount of ticks in your home’s vicinity. Double check to make the Environmental Protection Agency allows for pesticide application in your area.
  • Keep your yard free of debris and household items including things you’re waiting to donate or trash.
  • Remove fallen leaves immediately. Rake often since ticks will use leaves like blades of grass—perched and waiting to clasp on to the dog or cat.
  • If you don’t have a fenced backyard or there is a significant amount of brush along your property line, create a barrier to prevent ticks from crawling onto your lawn. Ensure the barrier is at least three feet wide and constructed from wood chips, rocks, or gravel.
  • Collect firewood? Make sure it stays neatly stacked in a cool, dry area to keep rodents away. Fewer rodents mean fewer hosts for ticks.
  • Plant Mother Nature’s tick repellent to keep ticks away from your home. Lavender and Peppermint are unappealing to ticks and, as an added bonus, are 100% non-toxic and safe for the family dog.
  • All exterior equipment including furniture, playground structures, even patios and decks should have ample distance from trees and bushes. Direct sunlight is best.

Keeping your lawn free of ticks is the best course of action for keeping them off your dog. By being proactive and looking after your yard, you’ll be saving your animal from blood-sucking ticks and yourself from the headache of treating them after a bite.

Winter Tips for Your Lawn

January 26th, 2017

Although Arizona isn’t subjected to the freezing temperatures most of the rest of the country endures around this time of year, winter weather still has an impact on Southwestern lawns and landscaping. As chilly temperatures begin to settle in for the coming weeks, here are a few winter tips to help keep your lawn healthy and happy until spring rolls back around.

Winter Tips for Your Lawn

Bermuda Grass in the Winter

Because of its hardy and drought-resistant nature, Bermuda grass has long been a favorite of Arizona homeowners. While it’s beautiful when it’s growing healthy and strong, colder temperatures can cause alarm for people who aren’t experienced in dealing with this type of lawn. Rest assured, this tough species doesn’t require much from you to get through the winter.

Here are some helpful hints:

  • Sod With No Overseed – If you didn’t overseed your sod, it’s probably gone dormant by now. There’s nothing to do now but sit back, relax, and let your lawn rest until the thermometer starts to rise again.
  • Overseeded Sod – If you overseeded your sod, it’s probably experiencing a little shock. As the bermuda grass begins to go dormant beneath the surface, small, quarter-sized yellow spots may begin to appear. These markings are nothing to fear. In fact, they’re an indication that your lawn was healthy when temperatures were warmer.

The spots occur because you probably overseeded during the warm season (late September to early October) when the bermuda grass was still flourishing and out-growing the ryegrass overseed. As it enters dormancy, it leaves behind evidence of the places where it was out-doing the overseeding.

To help your overseeded lawn heal these spots, switch from granular fertilizers, which are typically slow to get a reaction when the temperature drops, to foliar (spray) fertilizers during the winter months.

Winter Foliar Fertilizer 101

Many people fail to alter their lawn care routines when winter falls in Arizona. Although our state generally enjoys a mild climate between November and March, the temperatures can still drop below optimal levels if you’re using granular fertilizers. Foliar fertilizers’ formulas often withstand winter better than their granular counterparts, allowing your overseeded sod to perform at its best.

  • Heating Elements. Some foliar fertilizers heat the plants up, helping to facilitate growth. Ferrous sulfate and endurant turf paint will both provide heat to your overseeding.
  • Organic Options. There are certain organic fertilizers that work well in the winter. Seaweed extracts, kelp, and compost teas will help boost your roots while feeding the organisms within the soil that help your lawn grow. Ask our team about the best organic options for your particular species of grass.

Winter Watering 101

Your fertilizer isn’t the only element you should alter when winter comes – it’s also important to pay attention to the way you water your lawn. You should dramatically cut back on your watering schedule during the cold season. Your winter ryegrass requires a lot less water than your summer sod. You only need about 20 minutes of watering two to three times a week to keep your ryegrass properly hydrated from December through mid-February.

If you didn’t overseed, shoot for a monthly watering unless a good rainfall hits, in which case, you can wait to water until your lawn shows signs of stress.

Looking for a little more assistance? Be sure to check out our Evergreen Turf Fall Over-Seeking/ Winter Lawn Care Tips, and reach out to us if we can be of further service!

6 Easy Ways To Make Your Backyard Fun For Kids

January 13th, 2017

Entertaining your children needn’t cost an arm and a leg. Create a fun and safe backyard space for kids with the following DIY tips.

6 Easy Ways To Make Your Backyard Fun For Kids

Build a ground-level trampoline

As a safer, prettier alternative to a standard above-ground trampoline, consider one that lays flush with the ground. All Things Thrifty offers a helpful tutorial for building one yourself for less than $300 and a handful of supplies outside of your normal tool and garden kit. If you have a pool, build your ground level trampoline along the perimeter to serve as a second diving board.

Make a mud kitchen

Kids are happiest when they’re dirty! Let their creativity take center stage by providing tools for digging, molding, and shaping. Think of your backyard as an urban beach with mini shovels, buckets, tools, and more. Encourage your child to create “foods” such as mud pies as they experiment with Mother Nature’s materials including water to alternate the consistency of the messy medium.

Teach them how to grow

No, not emotionally—although that’s important too. Rather, learn how to grow food alongside your little one with a simple DIY garden bed. Whether you’re using individual potted plants for simple herbs or a fully converted sandbox, it’s easy to get kids excited about the idea of looking after a living thing. Tending to a home garden is also a great opportunity to teach your children about balanced nutrition and frugality.

Make a sand pit

Like the mud kitchen, a DIY sand pit will provide hours of entertainment for young ones who simply want to navigate the world around them on the ground floor. Build an easy teepee above a sand pit out of 2x4s for supervised climbing or add outdoor cushions around the edges to make the pit adult-friendly. Buckets, rope, toy cars, oversized rocks and sticks—the more “tools” the better.

Turn an outdoor fence into a chalkboard

Hey There, Home has an easy-to-follow tutorial for creating an outdoor chalkboard that will last for years to come. With a few supplies from your local hardware store you can have a canvas for the kids and their wildest creations.

Make a music wall

Get your children interested in music at an early age with household materials like old pots, bikes wheels or tire coverings—anything you can think of! There are no rules to a music wall other than ensuring your instruments are securely fastened with a nail or hook. Let your children make unique sounds with a worn out spatula or wooden spoon. The best part is sitting back and watching them explore with little to no instruction.

Any great backyard transformation doesn’t happen in a day. Start with one or two projects that seem most manageable and get the kids involved. Ask them to practice their writing skills by making a supply list or assign roles like “Best Assistant” and “Lead Painter.” Low cost backyard fun is right around the corner.

Don’t Miss Your Chance to Overseed This Year

January 3rd, 2017

Winter can really make you re-evaluate your lawn care regimen. Don’t like the look of a dormant lawn? Now is the perfect time to put your overseeding plans into place so you don’t have to deal with a dormant lawn ever again.

arizona sod can be overseeded for a green lawn all year

You may have noticed that some of your neighbors’ lawns are keeping up their curb appeal as the temperatures have begun to drop. Chances are, they started overseeding with perennial ryegrass when it was still warm outside. The best way to produce a perfect winter lawn is to overseed around the middle of October.

Why Should You Overseed Your Arizona Lawn in the Fall?

Because Arizona summers are notoriously scorching, the ground stays warm much longer than it does it much of the country. Because of this, fall lends itself to an optimal overseeding environment in Arizona, as temperatures tend to linger at or below 65 degrees when night falls beginning in October.

Autumn creates the perfect environment: Soil that’s still warm from the summer heat and cool air that helps facilitate germination.

When you time it right and employ just the right tools, equipment, and ingredients, a lawn that’s overseeded in the fall will yield green grass all year.

What Happens when You Overseed in the Fall?

Simply put, when you overseed, you’re planting a grass seed directly onto an existing turf. This process works great for seasonal grasses such as bermudagrass, which is a warm-season grass. Bermudagrass is super hardy and drought-resistant, which makes is an excellent option for the Southwestern lawns of Arizona in the summer months. In the winter, bermudagrass goes dormant, however, which can leave a lack-luster lawn.

Overseeding allows you to replace dormant warm-season grass with cool-season seeds that will take over when your bermudagrass dies out. By choosing an optimal fertilizer and watering regularly (but not too much), your overseeded bermudagrass will continue to grow as the ryegrass begins to take root.

In the beginning of the overseeding season, the warm temperatures tend to lend themselves to outstanding growth of the bermudagrass, which often out-competes the ryegrass. As the ryegrass begins to grow, your lawn will likely look immaculate, as both species of grass are growing together. When colder temperatures settle in, the bermudagrass will head into dormancy, leading the way for your well-nourished ryegrass to take its place on your lawn.

By combining warm-season grass and cool-season overseeding, you’ll ensure a lawn that’s healthy, lush, and green all year long.

Need a reminder to help you remember when it’s time to fertilize your Arizona sod lawn? Our Evergreen Turf team will be happy to help you keep your lawn looking lush and green all year long. Sign up for fertilizer reminders today!

How To Get A Sod Lawn On A Budget In Arizona

December 16th, 2016

Beautifying your home with a sod lawn doesn’t have to break the bank. Get started with the following tips from homeowners.

How To Get A Sod Lawn On A Budget In Arizona

Step 1: Measure Twice, Cut Once

Follow the old carpenter’s creed and measure your lawn twice to ensure accuracy. Sod comes in rolls that typically cover 20×25 feet of yard space. Check with your garden center for exact measurements and plan to have the sod delivered the same day you want to install it.

Step 2: Remove Grass

Removing dead grass will take a while, but the more you’re able to clear, the better. Cut whatever you can’t remove as low as possible. Remove rocks, twigs, and other debris to ensure you’re starting with a clean slate. Next, wet the lawn and aerate it so that your sod can become deeply rooted. The easiest way to do this is to rent a soil aerator. Home Depot offers basic aerator rentals (ideal for small to medium sized lawns) for less than $100 per day.

Step 3: Prepare The Soil

Aerating the lawn will most likely present more work, so don’t stop preparing just yet. Remove any newly discovered soil plugs, weeds, or rocks throughout the yard. Your goal is to clear the space entirely of things that would inhibit the growth of new sod—otherwise your hard work will have been in vain. Drainage problems? Fix them. Heaps of dirt? Level them. Be sure to mark the precise location of sprinkler heads and underground utilities for easy access once sod has been installed. Lastly, fertilize the yard with a heavier concentration of phosphorous and wet the earth one final time.

Step 4: Install Sod

Lay your new squares of sod as closely as you can get them without overlapping. Prevent gaps by working slowly and squeezing two pieces together with your hands before laying the third. Start from the straightest point in the yard (e.g. along the fence) and work your way inward. Stagger each roll of sod as you would if you were laying bricks. Using a sod cutter or sharp knife, cut the sod accordingly once you begin to fill in oddly-shaped areas and the space around sprinkler heads. Avoid air pockets by working slowly and patting the sod down as you go without stepping on it.

Step 5: Maintain

A thorough watering is the best way to complete your sod installation. Water once per day—mornings are preferable due to less heat and evaporation. Be aware that night watering can encourage fungal disease since the lawn won’t have a chance to dry out in the sun. Taper your schedule to every other day after the first week and eventually twice per week. Keep off the new lawn for at least one week which might mean taking the kids to the park and keeping the family dog indoors.

When it comes time to mow, aim for a 1/3 of the lawn’s current height. For example, if your grass has grown three inches, mow it down to two. Avoid the weight of a riding lawnmower as the grass will be susceptible to damage. Opt instead for a traditional walking mower with a sharp blade. Bag your trimmings.

Laying your own sod is certainly a good way to work your muscles and learn a new skill. And as with any successful DIY project, the feeling of accomplishment carries its own set of rewards.

If you choose not to DIY, we offer professional install when you purchase our sod in Phoenix, Tucson and surrounding areas.

Contact us to order your sod.

Fence Line Landscaping: Beautiful Looks for Your Property’s Borders

December 16th, 2016

Wondering what to do with the area around your fence to make it less boring and more eye-catching? Here are some fence line landscaping ideas for homeowners.

Here are some fence line landscaping ideas for homeowners.

A Clean and Simple Perimeter

Sharp lines often signify clean designs, and when it comes to your yard, this rule still holds true. Sometimes the simplest of layouts can bring the most peace and serenity to a property. If your goal is to create an inviting space that speaks to the simplicity of life, stay centered by keeping the center of your property plain and well-maintained.

Along the fence line, create a space of one to a few feet between your property’s perimeter and the lawn. Define this space using pavers, bricks, or other landscaping accessories. Fill the void in your newly-defined space with mulch, and small shrubs. Plan ahead before you plant them so you can be sure to evenly distribute them along your fence line.

The sharp lines and small shrubs will be easy to maintain and won’t be overwhelming when you walk into your yard.

Bolstering Your Border with Bricks and Flowers

Looking for a way to incorporate a little more color into your life? Why not expand this Side Yard Makeover idea, and take it to the next level by covering more square footage than that which simply rests alongside your house?

Start by choosing plants that grow well in Arizona, such as desert agave or blackfoot daisy perennials. Plant them a few inches from your fence along your entire fence line, taking care space them evenly from beginning to end. Cover the area with weed control fabric to help keep pesky gardening maintenance at bay. You’ll probably want to cut some holes in the fabric to allow the plants to grow. Cover the fabric with a good amount of mulch.

Dig a path around the outer edge of the of the flowerbed, and lay stone edgers from end to end, taking care to tuck the weed control fabric under each brick as you move along. Once the edgers are laid, you may find that you have even more room to add color. If you want to fill in the gaps with additional plant-inspired creativity, take a step back, and think about what you want your final project to look like. You could sporadically place a few prickly pear cactuses to add bright flair to your southwestern yard, or sprinkle in some salvia plants for a fuller experience.

Yin Yang Yard Serenity

Take your landscape design to flowy new levels with two-different colors of stones. Create a yin yang garden by choosing two different shades of stones that complement and offset each other at the same time. Create fluidity by separating the two colors with a ridge of rocks that define each color’s specific space. As an added bonus, you can add a few Arizona-friendly plants into your rock gardens, and you still won’t need to worry about using an excessive amount of water. Rock gardens take care of themselves and require virtually no additional maintenance once they’re in place.

For more stunning landscaping ideas, be sure to check out our Evergreen Turf Sod Blog!