History of Sod – Sod Houses

December 16th, 2016

When people think back on the olden days, everybody pictures the log cabins that appear as part of America’s history in some of the oldest photos available. While it’s true that trees did serve as the home retreat for many settlers during our country’s infancy, another of Mother Nature’s materials was also widely used among pioneer families to make homes: Sod.

The History of Sod - Sod Houses | Evergreen Turf: Arizona's Premier Sod Supplier

Bark and branches were fantastic when they were available, but not every part of our country had access to ample amounts of trees. In fact, there were areas where people could go for miles upon miles without spotting a single tree. As settlers traveled across the plains and prairies of the central and western United States, they were forced to get a bit more creative with their natural resources. In these barren lands where the idea of forests was purely fictional, homesteaders turned to the ground beneath their feet to build roofs over their heads.

How Sod Homes Were Made

It all started with the strong, intricate root systems of plains grass. Holding the earth beneath them in their tight, compact grip, the roots served as a starting point for what would later become sod bricks. When the earth was soft and moist, particularly after a good rain in the summer or a spring thaw of melting snow, settlers would use ox-drawn sod cutters to plow the land and break up the earth. These sod cutters were particularly designed to cut the clumps of dirt into long and narrow pieces. From this point, the settlers used axes to chop the strips into brick-sized pieces. Just as you would expect, these sod bricks were then stacked vertically, one by one, side by side, forming the walls of settlers’ sod homes.

Once the walls were constructed, the structures were usually topped with roofs made from interlaced twigs, hay, thin branches, or other readily-available natural resources. The final touch often included another layer of sod atop the twigs and branches as a finishing touch. It wasn’t uncommon to see sod homes built into the sides of hills or banks. This saves the settlers time and energy, as they could dig away the earth at the side of the incline, using the dug-outs to serve as portions of the homes’ walls and roofs.

Why Sod Homes Worked

For starters, any shelter is better than no shelter at all. Prairie grass and the surrounding sod was readily available in certain parts of the country, and it served its purpose in providing walls and a roof to those who needed them. Because sod was available in ample supply, these houses were cheap to make. Their earthen construction also worked well in accordance with seasonal temperature changes; they were often warm in the winter, and they usually stayed cool in the summer months.

Why Sod Homes Didn’t Work

Alas, you’re not likely to look around and see tons of sod homes as you’re driving to and from work these days. As it turns out, sod homes had some significant deficits, despite doing their best to keep settlers warm, safe, and dry. Of course, being that these homes were made completely of grass and dirt, snakes, mice, and other critters saw no problem calling these houses their homes. Rattlesnakes were known to move in and become unwelcome roommates, and there wasn’t much the settlers could do about it.

These earthen structures were also susceptible to the elements. Leaky roofs were quite common, if not completely expected. Once water found its way into the homes, the dirt floors became muddy messes. Naturally, the sod that comprised the roofs, when wet, became quite heavy as well. Collapses and cave-ins were common in the days after big rains, as the layers of earth took days to dry out, and the structures weren’t often sturdy enough to withstand the heavy sod tops.

All in all, sod homes did their duties until something better was able to be built. Although they certainly weren’t meant to last for lifetimes, America’s early settlers learned to love sod in their own rights and rely on this great material that our Arizona Turf team prides itself on today.

Did our story about sod houses and settlers teach you something new about our country’s history? We’d love to hear your thoughts at our Evergreen Turf Facebook page!

4 Fun and Easy Landscaping Ideas For Your Front Yard

December 16th, 2016

Looking to spruce up your front yard? Curb appeal isn’t just a real estate term – every homeowner should enjoy the look of their most valuable asset. Draw inspiration from Pinterest and give your yard the makeover you’ve been wanting for years. Here are four fun and easy landscaping ideas for your front yard.

4 Fun and Easy Landscaping Ideas For Your Front Yard

Mid-Century Modern

Nothing alludes to a good mid-century vibe quite like clean lines and simple aesthetics. Even if your home’s interior doesn’t match, opt for a 1950s landscape by laying large square cement pavers. Fill in the spaces with rock and/or grass.

Other tips:

Add a small vintage bistro set on the patio to tie the look together—a small bench or powder coated metal chair will work well too. Flamingo lawn ornaments could lend a playful, welcoming element to your walkway.

The Warmest Welcome

Don’t shy away from using doorway décor to get your message across. Do you host frequently? Have a large collection of trinkets in the home? Take that cozy vibe outdoors with a welcome sign or seasonal flag. DIY signs look anything but cheap when you use a wood stain and carefully-applied stencils.

Other tips:

Add a few candles in a large glass vase or potted plants. Work with the changing seasons by adding a pop of color for spring and a pair of pumpkins in the fall. Sometimes replacing a worn out welcome mat is enough to give the porch a fresh face.

Next Level DIY

Ditch the high-maintenance flower beds in favor of a Do-It-Yourself walkway made from pallet boards. Hometalk shows you how it’s done:

  • First, clear the area you intend to use for the walkway. It may require some digging or the removal of existing plants and shrubs.
  • Next, dampen the ground and lay fresh soil so that it’s easy to work with around and between the pallets.
  • Lay the boards into the soil and pack well. Whether it’s curvy or straight, the important thing is to give the pathway a walk test to ensure it is smooth.
  • Add a coat of outdoor sealant. Not only will it add a bit of shine, it will help prevent rot and extend the longevity of your new walkway.

How to find free pallets:

Check your local businesses first. Large chain stores generally have specific processes for waste disposal and won’t part with extra wood. Scour garden shops or hardware stores—motorcycle shops too. Mind your manners and ask! A little kindness goes a long way.

Enhance Your Garden

The best makeovers are those that include the existing features of any given space. Does your front yard contain several trees? Make them pop with a circular enclosure—an easy way to incorporate a stunning focal point that would otherwise be lost in a sea of similar suburban homes. Start by laying flagstone wall blocks to form a circle around your plant of choice—staggering them as you would brick. No flagstone? Use large rocks instead. Fill in the circle with decorative rock or a vibrant flower bed.

Other tips:

Turn an eye-sore of a focal point into a jaw-dropper by placing faux hollow rocks over unsightly pipes and sprinklers. Elevate your garden by making a raised flowerbed along the path that leads to your front door. All it takes is one or two small projects to completely transform your home’s exterior.

For more inspiration, visit Pinterest and peruse additional front yard landscaping ideas. Design a yard that makes you proud to call your house a home – one that will stand above the rest.

Creating an Eco-Friendly Yard

November 1st, 2016

You can have a lush green yard and still make it eco-friendly. Here are some tips on creating an eco-friendly yard in Arizona.

arizona sod

Things to Avoid

While pesticides and herbicides are a quick, effective approach to lawn maintenance, you may be interested in methods that are a bit kinder to the environment, and to the family pets who explore the outside world with their noses and mouths. Instead, opt for:

  • Pulling weeds manually. It doesn’t have to be a hassle if you commit to a regular schedule. As an added bonus, you’ll get a great workout!
  • Natural herbicides like hot water, table salt, vinegar, or essential oils like cinnamon, clove or citrus. Simply pour or spray over unsightly weeds.
  • Take the garlic and onion from your garden and return it to the Earth as a pesticide. Pulse one whole onion and one clove of garlic in a food processor then add one quart of water. Use the diffused water as a plant spray. (Note: dogs should not eat onions. They are toxic to them.)

Taking the First Step

There’s no need to feel overwhelmed when restructuring your lawn to be more environmentally friendly. Implement one or two easy changes and build upon your eco-friendly yard from there.

  1. Harvest rainwater to naturally hydrate your plants. Because rainwater contains less salt and more nitrogen, it’s a healthier choice than tap water. Create a basin to allow for collection and optimal saturation.
  2. Be a smarter waterer. Take the time to learn the specific water needs of each plant in your yard as they’re not all created equal. Use a soaker hose rather than a sprinkler to cut water usage up to 50%. Water earlier in the day to minimize evaporation.
  3. Create a compost bin to nourish your garden, aerate soil, and decrease your contribution to local landfills. Fill the compost with items such as: fruit and vegetable peels, coffee grounds and used filters, tissues, paper towels, egg shells, and shredded paper.

Choose Plants Wisely

Even if you keep your lawn in immaculate condition, the fact is some plants are better than others in terms of maintenance and the environmental impact made by watering and fertilizing.

  • Indigenous trees and flowers require less care than plants that aren’t native to Arizona. Find the right plants for your yard and you’ll see them thrive without much work on your part.
  • Utilize companion planting as a way to optimize small garden space and promote healthy growth. Companion plants also create healthy soil and discourage unwanted pests from settling in the area. Some examples of companion plants are:
    • Roses and garlic to act as a natural pest repellent.
    • Carrots and leeks due to the smells of each.
    • Chives and tomatoes—the former protects the latter.
    • Cucumbers, radishes, and dill keep cucumber beetles away from the whole bunch.
    • Carrots and spring onions—a mutually beneficial match.
  • Attract pollinators with specific flower species.
    • Butterflies love bright hues of yellow, red, orange and purple along with flowers with flat blossoms. They also flock to fallen fruit, so don’t be afraid to leave it on the ground—it’s great butterfly food and a natural compost.
    • Bees are attracted to the natural pollen and nectar of wildflowers and bright flowers that grow singly rather than together.

If you need sod in Phoenix or Tucson, or surrounding areas of Arizona, contact us today.

How to Attract Bees to Your Yard

November 1st, 2016

Bees are beneficial in many ways, which is exactly why you should consider attracting more bees to your own yard. Intrigued?  Read on to learn more about the importance of bees, and how to attract bees to your yard!

arizona sod

Why Are Bees Important?

From the pretty petals you like to pick up and smell to the fruits and veggies that are the root of your home garden, many of the plants you encounter on a daily basis needed a little help getting going.

Pollination is the process whereby pollen is transferred from the male part of the flower (the stamen) to the female part (the stigma).  When boy meets girl, seedlings begin to grow.  Sounds simple enough, right?  Because these two parts of the flower don’t connect naturally, the pollen needs a little help getting from one spot to the other.  This is where bees come into play.

When bees stop by to smell the roses (or any other flower), the plant’s pollen collects on the body of the bee.  As the bee wanders around the petals, the pollen falls of its body, distributing this seed-creating substance from the stamen to the stigma.  There are literally dozens of foods and plants we may not ever even know about if it weren’t for the handy assistance of bees helping to pollenate the flowers.

Why Are Bees in Danger?

Over the last decade or so, a few bee scares have hit the headlines.  On a number of occurrences, massive numbers of bees died seemingly simultaneously, causing widespread alarm, if not panic, in parts of the country.

As it turns out, the death of bee populations doesn’t necessarily signify the end of the world, but it does raise a red flag of awareness.  MSNBC explored Why we can’t stop panicking about the honeybees last year in an interesting article that explores the recent spike in bee deaths.

In the end, it seems bees’ lives changed dramatically when they became commercialized worker bees, so to speak.  Once upon a time, bees could frolic and pollinate small, organic, diverse fields to their hearts’ content.  In today’s world, they’re exposed to plenty of chemicals and pesticides; meanwhile, their natural habitats are diminishing.

How to Welcome Bees into Your Yard

Ready to create a buzzworthy habitat for your favorite pollinating property guests?  It doesn’t take a ton of work to welcome bees into your yard, but you’ll likely notice a big change in your ecosystem’s happiness shortly.  Foods and plants that produce flowers will roll out the red carpet for your stinger-wielding, winged friends.

Consider planting these flowers and plants:

  • In the Garden: Peas, squash, eggplant, broccoli, cucumbers, watermelons, and pumpkins
  • Around the Yard: Pear, plum, and apple trees
  • Sweet Finishes: Raspberries, blackberries, and gooseberries

Use chemical-free pesticides.  As we discussed, chemicals and pesticides have been major contributors to the decline of bee populations.  Chemical-free plants equal happy bees, so go organic, and stick to a more natural way of life.  Your bees will thank you.

Make a Bee Shelter.  Bee pots are easy to make, and they provide great refuge for hardworking pollinators.  Start with a small clay pot and a small lump of garden moss to cover the drainage hole.  Fill the rest of the pot loosely with hay, then place the pot upside down in a warm, sheltered spot in your yard or garden.  Bury half the pot underground to keep it from going anywhere.  The moss will shift down once the pot is upside down, allowing just enough space for the bees to come and go.

If you’re feeling super crafty, try making a mason bee house.

Have you been successful at bringing bees to your yard?  We’d love to hear about it!  Please share your bee stories and photos at our Evergreen Turf Facebook page!

Top 3 Organic Fertilizers for Sod

November 1st, 2016

Gone are the days of using traditional fertilizer to take care of your sod. Not only can it be costly, fertilizer can actually do more harm than good—to both grasses and the animals that walk on it. Go the eco-friendly route with these top three organic fertilizers for your Arizona sod lawn.

arizona sod

First, it’s important to know that compost—whether homemade or bagged—is what nourishes your soil whereas fertilizer is what feeds your plants. To maintain a healthy lawn, spread compost two to three times per year. Making your own compost pile is easy…

  • Use a large bin in order to retain moisture and heat. Compost bins are classified as being either stationary or rotational.
  • Compost materials must be turned in order to provide the oxygen required to break down the contents.
  • Understand the compost bin you choose should be dependent upon the plant matter you plan to contribute along with your intended time frame for usage.
  • Compost piles should be a mix of green and brown matter. Brown material can be tiny bits of shredded paper, dry leaves, and coffee grounds while green can consist of fruit and vegetable peels. Aim for a 1:1 ratio of green and brown.
  • You’ll know when the compost is ready for use when it resembles natural soil. It should be dark and crumbly. When you’re ready to use it—
    • Spread it across your lawn and rake it in evenly to create a thin layer no thicker than a quarter inch. If it’s clearly visible or appears to be sitting atop the blades, you’ve used too much.
    • Water for 15-20 minutes and adhere to your normal watering schedule for one week. Do not mow your lawn during this time—let the sod absorb the nutrients from the compost.

If a compost pile sounds like too much work, use composted cow manure. Like fertilizer, manure can burn the lawn if it’s not thoroughly composted so be careful. Heed the following tips to make sure it’s done correctly:

  • Make sure it’s is dry as there is a high concentration of methane gas in the wet stuff—a surefire way to kill your lawn.
  • Collect your supplies: manure, gloves, shovel, bucket, rake, fertilizer spreader and hose with spray attachment.
  • Break up large chunks of manure with the rake or your hands and shovel contents into a bucket.
  • Pour the manure into the fertilizer spreader and spray it evenly over your sod. It helps to walk in a straight line up and down the lawn.
  • Soak the lawn to ensure the cow manure seeps into the roots of your sod grass and keep off! That means foot traffic from humans and pets.
  • Repeat process monthly for optimal results.

Visit your local home garden center and purchase an organic fertilizer.

  • Top brands include Milorganite, Safer Brand, and Bradfield Organics.
  • Fertilizing schedules depend upon your specific sod type, so be sure to follow the recommendations you researched or received from your sod installation professional. In general, you should follow your lawn’s normal water and mow schedule, making sure to leave the grass trimmings in the yard to decompose.
  • When it comes time to fertilize, choose a slow release organic product and be sure not to overfeed. Follow the instructions on the bag. As a rule of thumb, fertilization should take place in early fall and in the spring.

Organic fertilizing may seem arduous, but the payoff for being environmentally conscious is greater than you might expect. Feed your lawn the nutrients it needs to reap the benefits of beauty and sustainability in your yard.

Contact us today if you need sod in Arizona.

The 5 Best Arizona Climbing Plants for Your Backyard

November 1st, 2016

There are many types of Arizona climbing plants you can use on your backyard pergola or outdoor wall. These vines add a unique beauty to virtually any landscape, without needing much water – a huge bonus for homeowners in the Arizona desert.

arizona sod

Here are the 5 best Arizona climbing plants for your backyard:

Rose

Botanical Name: Rosa banksiae 
Common Name: Lady Banks’ Rose

View a photo here: http://www.amwua.org/photo_detail.html?recordid=474

This beautiful plant can also withstand temps as low as 10 degrees Fahrenheit. It thrives in full sun and requires moderate water. It grows fast and can grow as tall as 20 feet high and 15 feet wide.

Honeysuckle

Botanical Name: Tecomaria capensis
Common Name: Cape Honeysuckle

View a photo here: http://www.amwua.org/photo_detail.html?recordid=578

Not quite as hardy as the rose, the honeysuckle can withstand temps down to 28 degrees Fahrenheit. It loves full and partial sun and requires moderate watering to stay healthy. It’s significantly smaller than the rose plant, growing to a max of 6′ height X 5′ width.

Primrose Jasmine

Botanical Name: Jasminum mesnyi
Common Name: Primrose Jasmine

View a photo here: http://www.amwua.org/photo_detail.html?recordid=468

This sprawling plant blooms with gorgeous yellow flowers during late winter through spring. Not that it’s relevant to the Arizona desert, but the plant can live in temps as low as 15 degrees Fahrenheit. It does best in partial and full sun, and require moderate watering. With a max growth of 10’ height x 6’ wide, it made our list of the best climbing plants to use in Arizona backyards.

Trumpet Vine

Botanical Name: Podranea ricasoliana 
Common Name: Pink Trumpet Vine

View a photo here: http://www.amwua.org/photo_detail.html?recordid=584

The pink trumpet vine survives in cold weather down to 25 degrees Fahrenheit but thrives in full sun as well as partial sun, and require low watering. It grows tall, up to 20’ height x 10’ width. The flowers bloom in late summer to fall and have a wonderful fragrance.

Bougainvillea

Botanical Name: Bougainvillea spectabilis 
Common Name: Bougainvillea

View a photo here: http://www.amwua.org/photo_detail.html?recordid=465

This may be one of the most well-known climbing plants in Arizona as it’s a popular choice for homeowners and business owners alike. It can survive in temps as low as 28 degrees Fahrenheit and loves full sun or reflected sun. The reason it’s so often chosen among people in Arizona is not just its beautiful flowers but its ability to thrive with low water. It’s an added bonus that the flowers can bloom year-round, weather permitting.

So there you have it! Our top 5 picks for the best Arizona climbing plants.

Need sod for your Arizona home or business? Contact us today.

Unique Sod Lawn Landscaping Ideas

September 27th, 2016

Want a grass lawn that stands out from your neighbors’ front yards? There are plenty of ways to play up your yard! Here are some ideas we have to help you take a standard sod lawn to the next level with some unique landscaping ideas:

King Me.

Unique Sod Lawn Landscaping Ideas

Your home is your palace, and your yard is a place where you should feel like royalty every time you step onto your lawn.  Create a checkered pattern that’s marked by sod and stone or tile to elevate your outdoor experience.

A checkered pattern alone sounds like a pretty simple concept, but there are plenty of complex lawn projects that take the idea of checker boards to the next level.  You are afforded the ability to create a checkered lawn that’s as simple or complicated as you wish, and your guests are sure to appreciate any of the artful avenues you choose to use.

Layer Up.

Take dimension to a new level by layering up with steps made of steel.  Just as vertical storage inside your house can create additional space and enhance the illusion of a place, making it bigger than it really is, a layered lawn can offer a tiered presentation of an otherwise ordinary space.

Layering techniques are often excellent ways to balance bulky items that can be focal points on the property.  If you have a big tree on one side of the yard, a layered design might be the perfect way to balance that element and create an easy-to-view curb appeal that plays to its own landscape aesthetics.

Find Your Focus

Your lawn doesn’t have to be all about sod!  Just like a great paint job can be perfectly accented by just the right front door on your house, a beautiful lawn can easily be enhanced with the right decorative items.  Create a focal point in your yard that will serve as a conversation and compliment piece when visitors stop by.

Fire

 

The great thing about most focal points that belong on the lawn is that you can create your own if you feel like embarking on a DIY project.  Otherwise, there are plenty of store-bought options that will make exceptional yard accessories.

Great lawn-worthy focal points that you might want to consider adding your yard could include

  • A fire pit
  • An outdoor room
  • A water feature

If you want a lawn that makes people pay attention, beautiful grass is just the beginning.  A little creativity and out-of-the-box thinking when it comes to your blades can completely change the personality of your property.  There are plenty of ideas you probably have never even thought about.  Take some time to peruse the internet for interesting ideas, and when you’ve compiled some inspirational items, contact sod professionals.

At Evergreen Turf, we love the idea of a new challenge that involves a little lawn creativity!  As Arizona’s premier sod producer, we’ve had our hand in some great projects.  Check out our slideshow to see a few examples!

How to Incorporate Sports Areas in Your Yard

September 27th, 2016

Does your family love playing outdoor sports like soccer, baseball, football, and basketball? Whether you just toss the ball around for a little friendly family bonding, or your household athletes really need a place they can integrate into part of their training camp routines, why not make the most of your yard by putting some sporty style into your landscaping?

How to Incorporate Sports Areas in Your Yard

Here are a few ways you can integrate the sporty side of life into the design of your very own lawn:

  • Make a Soccer Field. If your lawn is abundant in acreage, and you have the space, a well-groomed soccer field can be an amazing addition to your landscaping efforts.  With the help of professional sod experts, you can choose a great grass that’s built for rough-and-tumble trampling, which will still come out on top when the final goal is scored.  Goal nets on both ends and beautiful striped sod between them will create a spectacular soccer field that any athlete would be proud to call his or her home turf.

Related: Check out our sod installation photos from The University of Arizona’s Soccer Field.

  • Build a Baseball Field. Ah, yes!  America’s pastime!  No kid’s childhood is complete if they don’t spend a little time with a ball and bat.  You may have little leaguers who do their best just to keep their helmets on during batting practice, or perhaps you’ve got a high school baseball star who’s ready to make a name for himself with a full ride to college.  In any case, a backyard play area, complete with a baseball field, offers your friends and family a great way to get out and play.

A backyard baseball field isn’t exactly the same sandlot that generations before explored when they needed a place to toss the ball around.  In fact, it’s much better.  You’ll still have all four bases, but the beautiful diamond that connects them together will be on your own private property.  What a great way to celebrate holidays like Labor Day and the 4th of July when family and friends are all around!

  • Set Up a Trampoline. There’s plenty of fun to be had when kids and adults alike spend hours jumping up and down like a happy bag of popcorn.  If you’re concerned about safety, opt for an in-ground installation so your jumpers aren’t sailing high into the sky whey go on their gravity-defying adventures.  An in-ground trampoline can be the perfect focal point for some surrounding landscaping that will be Pinterest-worthy before you know it!
  • Put Up a Basketball Hoop. A basketball hoop is the classic way to embrace outdoor sports without leaving your own yard.  These days, you have plenty of options.  Mount a backboard over your garage for a space-saving installation.  If you’re interested in a free-standing set of hoops, take a second to browse the internet so you can see what’s out there.  There are plenty of styles, levels of quality, and price ranges that will fit anyone’s needs.
  • Paint a Football Field. When summer begins to sizzle away and fall settles in for the next few months, football fever begins to take over.  Paint a football field on your lawn for a day of fun with friends and family.  Don’t forget to grab some hotdogs and heat up the grill for a full fall-time festivity!

You don’t have to head to a professional arena to enjoy a good game.  You don’t even have to head to the local park.  With a little ingenuity, your property is the perfect place to play all sorts of sports.  Once your yard is the go-to place for parties, you can charge an entry fee to your friends!

Contact us if you need sod in Arizona. Need help? Talk to one of our sod specialists. Call: 602-626-9959

What To Do When Sod Will Not Grow

September 27th, 2016

As an Arizonan, you know adequate sunlight isn’t usually a problem for your outdoor plants. High temperatures and consistent seasonal weather make caring for Arizona sod grass fairly easy. However, if you have a multi-story home or large structure such as a covered patio or shed, your lawn may not be getting the sunlight it needs. To ensure your yard stays guest-ready at all times, ditch the trouble spots in favor of decorative alternatives.

Arizona sod - What To Do When Sod Will Not Grow

Stepping Stones

One of the most common causes of a spotty lawn is lack of sunlight as a result of too much shade from trees or the home itself. Pave the perimeter of your backyard with stepping stones and fill the gaps with small rocks. As an added bonus, you can train your pets to use that area for urination—another common cause of dead sod patches.

Outdoor Furniture

When grass just won’t grow where you need it to, turn the area into a place of entertainment. Not only will you encourage foot traffic in the right places (read—off your beautiful lawn), you’ll have a relaxing space in which to eat, chat, and unwind after a long day. Consider buying a picnic table and chairs or scouring yard sales for a hammock.

Water Features

Add a touch of zen to your yard with a water fountain or koi pond. Have a pool? Line the shaded side of your home with stones and install an outdoor shower head for rinsing off chlorine. Whichever water feature you choose is guaranteed to look far better than a patch of unnourished sod. It may even inspire you to redecorate other areas of the yard for a polished look.

Trees, shrubs, or cacti

If you have a particularly large area of shade, create a border with decorative bricks and add shade-tolerant and/or drought-tolerant plants to the space. You don’t have to fill the area entirely—simply install rocks between plant life. A succulent garden is an excellent addition to any desert landscape and won’t require much maintenance.

Home gym

Turn your shady spots into an outdoor exercise area with rubber pavers. Take advantage of the fresh air and use the space for a weight bench or squat rack. Don’t want to invest in expensive hardware? Buy a cheap storage chest and stock it with things like a jump rope, set of dumbbells, kettle bell, yoga mat, and football or volleyball for an impromptu game.

Fire pit

Whether you build it or buy it, an outdoor fire pit adds romantic ambience to your yard for those nights you want to bundle up with your significant other. Perfect for shaded corners, a fire pit with chairs formed in a semi-circle can give the impression you never intended for grass to be there in the first place. Check out our article with some Backyard Fire Pit Ideas to get you started.

Rocks, rocks, rocks

If all else fails, install decomposed granite, river rock, pea gravel, or woodchips in the entire area. Rocks are a low-maintenance option that allows for a defined focal point and little maintenance (namely weed growth and debris collection). Determine your budget upfront and shop by square footage as you’ll have no shortage of styles from which to choose.

Everyone loves a lush grassy lawn, but you may have to accept that parts of your yard are not meant for grass. Use these ideas to turn those areas into a beautiful space that complements the remainder of your sod lawn.

Contact us if you need sod in Phoenix, Tucson and surrounding areas of Arizona. You can call us at 602.626.9959, email us at info@evergreenturf.com, or check out our Facebook page today.

Tips & Ideas For Adding Style To Your Outdoor Wall

September 27th, 2016

Planning a makeover for either your front yard, back yard or patio? Once you’ve ordered and installed some fresh sod in your lawn, it’s time to fix up the rest of the outdoor space! Here are some ideas on how to jazz up your outdoor walls.

Outdoor Wall Décor

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Use outdoor wall décor to bring some style to your walls. You can find these at practically any home and garden décor store, big-box retail store or online. They are typically made with metal materials to prevent damage from mother-nature.

You can even change out your wall décor with the seasons, or get a custom-made wall décor.  As an example, your last name or something similar that is personal to your family or home.

Crawling Plants

Get some plants that crawl up the wall, such as creeping rosemary. Other crawling plants that are adapted to the Arizona desert include:

  • Bougainvillea
  • Cape honeysuckle
  • Baja passion vine
  • Cat claw vine
  • Grape ivy
  • Pink / Purple trumpet vine
  • Lilac vine
  • Asian Jasmine
  • Creeping fig
  • Potato vine
  • Sky flower

Water-Wise Landscaping

When fixing up the area around your outdoor wall, it’s always important, especially here in Arizona, to think about how much water each plant species needs. Rather than planting things that need lots of water, plant native species like succulents to keep your water use to a minimum. Beyond succulents, find plants that speak to you. Consider some lavender or purple sage to bring pops of color to your space.

Final Tips

If you’re feeling like you need more outdoor wall ideas, check websites like Pinterest and Houzz for further inspiration.

If you need sod in Arizona, we service greater Phoenix, Tucson and many surrounding areas. Call us or order online today to get fresh sod for your yard.

In conclusion, remember to take the time to decorate your outdoor wall in a way that highlights your own style preferences and personality. At the same time, choose native species and be aware of how much water each plant needs. Have fun with your creation process!