Archive for the ‘Lawn Maintenance’ Category

How to Transition Your Lawn From Winter to Spring and Summer

Saturday, April 15th, 2017

Welcome to late spring in Arizona! The temperatures are quickly rising, and – if you haven’t already done so – it’s time to transition your lawn from winter to summer sod. Arizona’s climate is a special place, and the care your lawn needs is specific to our region. What works for other parts of the country simply isn’t applicable for a high-desert area, so to help you transition to your summer lawn, we’ve compiled a few tips.

Transitioning Your Lawn From Winter to Spring

Mid- to Late Spring: Proper Temperatures

In Arizona, transitioning from winter to summer sod usually starts when temperatures hit 95 to 100 degrees on a regular basis. When the thermometer begins to approach triple digits on a regular basis, rye wilts out, and Bermuda grass tries to grow.

At this phase, the first step is to lower the blades on your mower. By lowering your mowing height, you’ll give Bermuda the room it needs to grow.

Early to Mid-Summer: Dethatching

You should dethatch your lawn early to mid-summer. It’s important to wait until the Bermuda grass is ready to grow. If you dethatch too early, the process will discourage the rye grass from growing. Be mindful that dethatching can stress your lawn out a bit, so it’s important to take care of it throughout the process.

Alternatively, you can dethatch in mid-August when Bermuda grass is growing like crazy because it’s had all summer to become strong and healthy. If you wait until late summer, it will recover very quickly.

Early May: Fertilizing

You’ll want to use a complete fertilizer. Around May 1st, put your fertilizer out at half-rate. If you use full-rate fertilizer this early, the rye grass will grow too much. Although this may sound ideal, it’s not a good thing. You can use full-rate fertilizer in June when the Bermuda grass is really growing.

Throughout the Process: Watering

Your grass needs water throughout the transition process, but your lawn needs different amounts at distinct phases in the process. Be mindful that when it gets hot, your lawn will get spots as part of the transition process. Don’t overreact by over-watering. Instead, you simply need to hand-water your lawn just enough to nurture the brown spots away. If you water every two to three days, this should do the trick.

Are you ready to transition your Arizona lawn from winter to summer grass, but you’re not sure where to start? Our team at Evergreen Turf is here to help! Look at our How to Install Sod page, and feel free to reach out to us at 480.456.1199 if you have any questions!

Best Time to Lay Warm-Season Grass In Phoenix

Wednesday, March 1st, 2017

Taking care of your lawn is an important part of home ownership, but it’s not always easy – especially in the arid desert climate of Arizona. Some grasses do better than others in this region, and sometimes, timing is everything. If you’re laying fresh sod, however, practically anytime is a good time to lay your summer grass. You just need to make sure you take care of your lawn from beginning to end to ensure the best results.

arizona sod

Here are some things you should take into consideration:

Prep Properly For New Sod

It’s important to make sure the ground is properly prepared to ensure the soil will welcome your warm-season grass willfully. Your new grass will need a good amount of water, so you don’t want to under water, but you certainly don’t want to over water, either. You also need to ensure that you’re fertilizing appropriately to optimize growth.

If you’re uncertain how to prepare your lawn for warm-season grass, check out our how to install page.

Stay Patient With Dormant Lawns

If you had a warm season sod lawn last year, and you did not install a winter lawn, your summer lawn should grow back naturally as it comes out of dormancy. In this case, you should not need to lay new sod. Just stay patient, and wait for your beautiful green grass to begin growing again.

Overseeded Lawn – Do Maintenance

If you overseeded your lawn, you just have to perform a few maintenance tasks to get your summer lawn to come back this year. Take a look at our Spring Transition Guide for more help on the following:

  • Mowing your lawn at the right height – You’ll want to lower your mower so you remove approximately ½ the grass leaf blades. With easier access to light, the roots of your grass will receive heat, allowing them to wake up and begin growing.
  • Aerating your lawn – By putting small holes all over your lawn, you’ll invite heat to its root system, which also encourages grass to come out of dormancy.
  • Watering at optimal frequencies – You don’t want to stop watering completely, but it is important to cut back on watering during the spring lawn process. Ultimately, you’re trying to discourage growth of your winter ryegrass while encouraging your warm-weather Bermuda grass to make its springtime appearance.
  • Fertilizing with balanced ingredients – There are several different types of fertilizers, each of which is formulated with various amounts of essential minerals. If you choose the wrong fertilizer, you could set your lawn up for failure. However, the right formula will enhance the growth of your summer grass while further weakening your winter grass. As the ryegrass dies out, be sure to rake your lawn, allowing the Bermudagrass to have a clean canvass.

Still not sure how to make the most of your grass? Our Evergreen Turf team of professionals are experts at helping Arizona homeowners get ready for hot summers and beautiful lawns. Contact us, and let us know what we can do to help!

Arizona Lawn Care Tips for March

Tuesday, February 28th, 2017

While it comes as no surprise to homeowners who have installed sod, lush lawns are a labor intensive project. Being mindful of the seasons and their respective maintenance plans will facilitate healthy growth and thwart widespread disease. March is a great time to revisit your lawn care processes and adjust for the weather.

Arizona sod lawn care tips for spring

March Forecast

On average, Phoenix, Arizona, sees .9 inches of rain during the month of March. The average high is 75 degrees with an average low of 49. Temperatures will vary depending on your location within the valley, but seasonal averages can successfully guide you toward the right maintenance plan.

Sod Maintenance Tips for Spring

When spring is in the air, overwatering becomes the number one culprit of fungal infections. You should avoid mowing wet grass for the same reason as a problem confined to one area of the yard will soon spread throughout the entire lawn. Other weather-sensitive issues include:

  • Weeding: Summer is the worst time to try and tackle your weed problem since the roots will be well established and tough. Pre-emergent herbicides will save you days of labor and allow you to tackle the issue when weeds are soft and just beginning to grow.
  • Fertilizing: A quick spring fertilizer will prime your lawn for optimal growth throughout the season. The fertilizer you use will depend upon your particular sod type as well as any problems you may have faced during the winter months. The most important factor is finding the correct balance of essential nutrients conducive to Arizona’s climate.
  • Mowing: As discussed in a previous blog, the frequency and method of mowing will depend on your grass species and how quickly it’s growing. Always keep grass blades at 2/3 their height. As for frequency:
    • A Tifgreen sod lawn mowed below 1/2 of an inch may have to be mowed every 2-3 days.
    • A Midiron hybrid Bermuda sod lawn mowed at 2 inches may only have to be mowed once every 7-10 days.

Spring Gardening Tips

Once you’ve mastered sod care, it’s time to take full advantage of the season and enhance your beautiful yard even more. Spring is a great time to start a vegetable garden or grow your favorite flowers.

  • Best seeds: carrots, cucumbers, green onion, squash, peppers, tomatoes, melons, beets.
  • Best flowers: desert marigold, sunflower, safflower, verbena, cosmos, hollyhock.
  • Best herbs: basil, chamomile, sage, oregano, thyme, lemon grass, parsley, mint.
  • If you have citrus trees, remember to fertilize with nitrogen when they sprout leaves. Transplant new trees during this time as they’ll take approximately three years to produce fruit. A young tree (2-5 years old) will be easier to manage and yield fruit at the same time as an older tree.
  • For other landscape plants, don’t forget to water at least once a month in the absence of rainfall. Remove weeds early and often and prune the plants that are sensitive to frost once they leaf out.

By taking the time to properly care for your lawn, you’ll get to enjoy its beauty for years to come. Follow the recommended maintenance for your sod grass and—when in doubt—consult a professional to ensure its vibrancy and longevity.

Don’t Miss Your Chance to Overseed This Year

Tuesday, January 3rd, 2017

Winter can really make you re-evaluate your lawn care regimen. Don’t like the look of a dormant lawn? Now is the perfect time to put your overseeding plans into place so you don’t have to deal with a dormant lawn ever again.

arizona sod can be overseeded for a green lawn all year

You may have noticed that some of your neighbors’ lawns are keeping up their curb appeal as the temperatures have begun to drop. Chances are, they started overseeding with perennial ryegrass when it was still warm outside. The best way to produce a perfect winter lawn is to overseed around the middle of October.

Why Should You Overseed Your Arizona Lawn in the Fall?

Because Arizona summers are notoriously scorching, the ground stays warm much longer than it does it much of the country. Because of this, fall lends itself to an optimal overseeding environment in Arizona, as temperatures tend to linger at or below 65 degrees when night falls beginning in October.

Autumn creates the perfect environment: Soil that’s still warm from the summer heat and cool air that helps facilitate germination.

When you time it right and employ just the right tools, equipment, and ingredients, a lawn that’s overseeded in the fall will yield green grass all year.

What Happens when You Overseed in the Fall?

Simply put, when you overseed, you’re planting a grass seed directly onto an existing turf. This process works great for seasonal grasses such as bermudagrass, which is a warm-season grass. Bermudagrass is super hardy and drought-resistant, which makes is an excellent option for the Southwestern lawns of Arizona in the summer months. In the winter, bermudagrass goes dormant, however, which can leave a lack-luster lawn.

Overseeding allows you to replace dormant warm-season grass with cool-season seeds that will take over when your bermudagrass dies out. By choosing an optimal fertilizer and watering regularly (but not too much), your overseeded bermudagrass will continue to grow as the ryegrass begins to take root.

In the beginning of the overseeding season, the warm temperatures tend to lend themselves to outstanding growth of the bermudagrass, which often out-competes the ryegrass. As the ryegrass begins to grow, your lawn will likely look immaculate, as both species of grass are growing together. When colder temperatures settle in, the bermudagrass will head into dormancy, leading the way for your well-nourished ryegrass to take its place on your lawn.

By combining warm-season grass and cool-season overseeding, you’ll ensure a lawn that’s healthy, lush, and green all year long.

Need a reminder to help you remember when it’s time to fertilize your Arizona sod lawn? Our Evergreen Turf team will be happy to help you keep your lawn looking lush and green all year long. Sign up for fertilizer reminders today!

How To Get A Sod Lawn On A Budget In Arizona

Friday, December 16th, 2016

Beautifying your home with a sod lawn doesn’t have to break the bank. Get started with the following tips from homeowners.

How To Get A Sod Lawn On A Budget In Arizona

Step 1: Measure Twice, Cut Once

Follow the old carpenter’s creed and measure your lawn twice to ensure accuracy. Sod comes in rolls that typically cover 20×25 feet of yard space. Check with your garden center for exact measurements and plan to have the sod delivered the same day you want to install it.

Step 2: Remove Grass

Removing dead grass will take a while, but the more you’re able to clear, the better. Cut whatever you can’t remove as low as possible. Remove rocks, twigs, and other debris to ensure you’re starting with a clean slate. Next, wet the lawn and aerate it so that your sod can become deeply rooted. The easiest way to do this is to rent a soil aerator. Home Depot offers basic aerator rentals (ideal for small to medium sized lawns) for less than $100 per day.

Step 3: Prepare The Soil

Aerating the lawn will most likely present more work, so don’t stop preparing just yet. Remove any newly discovered soil plugs, weeds, or rocks throughout the yard. Your goal is to clear the space entirely of things that would inhibit the growth of new sod—otherwise your hard work will have been in vain. Drainage problems? Fix them. Heaps of dirt? Level them. Be sure to mark the precise location of sprinkler heads and underground utilities for easy access once sod has been installed. Lastly, fertilize the yard with a heavier concentration of phosphorous and wet the earth one final time.

Step 4: Install Sod

Lay your new squares of sod as closely as you can get them without overlapping. Prevent gaps by working slowly and squeezing two pieces together with your hands before laying the third. Start from the straightest point in the yard (e.g. along the fence) and work your way inward. Stagger each roll of sod as you would if you were laying bricks. Using a sod cutter or sharp knife, cut the sod accordingly once you begin to fill in oddly-shaped areas and the space around sprinkler heads. Avoid air pockets by working slowly and patting the sod down as you go without stepping on it.

Step 5: Maintain

A thorough watering is the best way to complete your sod installation. Water once per day—mornings are preferable due to less heat and evaporation. Be aware that night watering can encourage fungal disease since the lawn won’t have a chance to dry out in the sun. Taper your schedule to every other day after the first week and eventually twice per week. Keep off the new lawn for at least one week which might mean taking the kids to the park and keeping the family dog indoors.

When it comes time to mow, aim for a 1/3 of the lawn’s current height. For example, if your grass has grown three inches, mow it down to two. Avoid the weight of a riding lawnmower as the grass will be susceptible to damage. Opt instead for a traditional walking mower with a sharp blade. Bag your trimmings.

Laying your own sod is certainly a good way to work your muscles and learn a new skill. And as with any successful DIY project, the feeling of accomplishment carries its own set of rewards.

If you choose not to DIY, we offer professional install when you purchase our sod in Phoenix, Tucson and surrounding areas.

Contact us to order your sod.

History of Sod – Sod Houses

Friday, December 16th, 2016

When people think back on the olden days, everybody pictures the log cabins that appear as part of America’s history in some of the oldest photos available. While it’s true that trees did serve as the home retreat for many settlers during our country’s infancy, another of Mother Nature’s materials was also widely used among pioneer families to make homes: Sod.

The History of Sod - Sod Houses | Evergreen Turf: Arizona's Premier Sod Supplier

Bark and branches were fantastic when they were available, but not every part of our country had access to ample amounts of trees. In fact, there were areas where people could go for miles upon miles without spotting a single tree. As settlers traveled across the plains and prairies of the central and western United States, they were forced to get a bit more creative with their natural resources. In these barren lands where the idea of forests was purely fictional, homesteaders turned to the ground beneath their feet to build roofs over their heads.

How Sod Homes Were Made

It all started with the strong, intricate root systems of plains grass. Holding the earth beneath them in their tight, compact grip, the roots served as a starting point for what would later become sod bricks. When the earth was soft and moist, particularly after a good rain in the summer or a spring thaw of melting snow, settlers would use ox-drawn sod cutters to plow the land and break up the earth. These sod cutters were particularly designed to cut the clumps of dirt into long and narrow pieces. From this point, the settlers used axes to chop the strips into brick-sized pieces. Just as you would expect, these sod bricks were then stacked vertically, one by one, side by side, forming the walls of settlers’ sod homes.

Once the walls were constructed, the structures were usually topped with roofs made from interlaced twigs, hay, thin branches, or other readily-available natural resources. The final touch often included another layer of sod atop the twigs and branches as a finishing touch. It wasn’t uncommon to see sod homes built into the sides of hills or banks. This saves the settlers time and energy, as they could dig away the earth at the side of the incline, using the dug-outs to serve as portions of the homes’ walls and roofs.

Why Sod Homes Worked

For starters, any shelter is better than no shelter at all. Prairie grass and the surrounding sod was readily available in certain parts of the country, and it served its purpose in providing walls and a roof to those who needed them. Because sod was available in ample supply, these houses were cheap to make. Their earthen construction also worked well in accordance with seasonal temperature changes; they were often warm in the winter, and they usually stayed cool in the summer months.

Why Sod Homes Didn’t Work

Alas, you’re not likely to look around and see tons of sod homes as you’re driving to and from work these days. As it turns out, sod homes had some significant deficits, despite doing their best to keep settlers warm, safe, and dry. Of course, being that these homes were made completely of grass and dirt, snakes, mice, and other critters saw no problem calling these houses their homes. Rattlesnakes were known to move in and become unwelcome roommates, and there wasn’t much the settlers could do about it.

These earthen structures were also susceptible to the elements. Leaky roofs were quite common, if not completely expected. Once water found its way into the homes, the dirt floors became muddy messes. Naturally, the sod that comprised the roofs, when wet, became quite heavy as well. Collapses and cave-ins were common in the days after big rains, as the layers of earth took days to dry out, and the structures weren’t often sturdy enough to withstand the heavy sod tops.

All in all, sod homes did their duties until something better was able to be built. Although they certainly weren’t meant to last for lifetimes, America’s early settlers learned to love sod in their own rights and rely on this great material that our Arizona Turf team prides itself on today.

Did our story about sod houses and settlers teach you something new about our country’s history? We’d love to hear your thoughts at our Evergreen Turf Facebook page!

Creating an Eco-Friendly Yard

Tuesday, November 1st, 2016

You can have a lush green yard and still make it eco-friendly. Here are some tips on creating an eco-friendly yard in Arizona.

arizona sod

Things to Avoid

While pesticides and herbicides are a quick, effective approach to lawn maintenance, you may be interested in methods that are a bit kinder to the environment, and to the family pets who explore the outside world with their noses and mouths. Instead, opt for:

  • Pulling weeds manually. It doesn’t have to be a hassle if you commit to a regular schedule. As an added bonus, you’ll get a great workout!
  • Natural herbicides like hot water, table salt, vinegar, or essential oils like cinnamon, clove or citrus. Simply pour or spray over unsightly weeds.
  • Take the garlic and onion from your garden and return it to the Earth as a pesticide. Pulse one whole onion and one clove of garlic in a food processor then add one quart of water. Use the diffused water as a plant spray. (Note: dogs should not eat onions. They are toxic to them.)

Taking the First Step

There’s no need to feel overwhelmed when restructuring your lawn to be more environmentally friendly. Implement one or two easy changes and build upon your eco-friendly yard from there.

  1. Harvest rainwater to naturally hydrate your plants. Because rainwater contains less salt and more nitrogen, it’s a healthier choice than tap water. Create a basin to allow for collection and optimal saturation.
  2. Be a smarter waterer. Take the time to learn the specific water needs of each plant in your yard as they’re not all created equal. Use a soaker hose rather than a sprinkler to cut water usage up to 50%. Water earlier in the day to minimize evaporation.
  3. Create a compost bin to nourish your garden, aerate soil, and decrease your contribution to local landfills. Fill the compost with items such as: fruit and vegetable peels, coffee grounds and used filters, tissues, paper towels, egg shells, and shredded paper.

Choose Plants Wisely

Even if you keep your lawn in immaculate condition, the fact is some plants are better than others in terms of maintenance and the environmental impact made by watering and fertilizing.

  • Indigenous trees and flowers require less care than plants that aren’t native to Arizona. Find the right plants for your yard and you’ll see them thrive without much work on your part.
  • Utilize companion planting as a way to optimize small garden space and promote healthy growth. Companion plants also create healthy soil and discourage unwanted pests from settling in the area. Some examples of companion plants are:
    • Roses and garlic to act as a natural pest repellent.
    • Carrots and leeks due to the smells of each.
    • Chives and tomatoes—the former protects the latter.
    • Cucumbers, radishes, and dill keep cucumber beetles away from the whole bunch.
    • Carrots and spring onions—a mutually beneficial match.
  • Attract pollinators with specific flower species.
    • Butterflies love bright hues of yellow, red, orange and purple along with flowers with flat blossoms. They also flock to fallen fruit, so don’t be afraid to leave it on the ground—it’s great butterfly food and a natural compost.
    • Bees are attracted to the natural pollen and nectar of wildflowers and bright flowers that grow singly rather than together.

If you need sod in Phoenix or Tucson, or surrounding areas of Arizona, contact us today.

Arizona Lawn Care Tips

Wednesday, August 17th, 2016

Lawn care isn’t just about regular watering and the occasional weekend mow. Many frustrated homeowners would even argue it’s a science. Arizona lawns in particular must be properly maintained due to extreme summer temperatures. Keep your lawn looking just as nice as the day you laid sod with these maintenance tips for your backyard.

sod in arizona

Summer Watering Tips

  • Avoid watering daily as over-watering robs the root system of oxygen
  • Don’t be afraid of under-watering—the reverse is far more damaging. Water thoroughly but infrequently and always follow the guidelines for your particular grass
  • On average, ten inches of water below the soil provides enough depth to sufficiently water the grass. Pro tip: Test with a screwdriver one hour after watering.
  • Program your automatic sprinklers to activate 1-2 hours before sunrise to take advantage of cooler temperatures and minimal evaporation.

Preparing for the Cold

  • Understand that the dormancy period of your Arizona sod is standard and necessary for the life cycles of your grass.
  • If you can’t live without a beautiful green lawn in the winter, go ahead and overseed your warm-season grass with cool-season reinforcement.
  • Give Bermuda grass a rest every few years as overseeding can prove stressful to overworked roots.

Know How to Mow

Here’s the thing with mowing—it’s not only important to do it, it’s important to do it right. When overgrown, long blades provide too much shade preventing the shorter ones from growing. This leads to shaggy grass with tons of space for—you guessed it—weeds. If you mow your grass too short, it sucks up too much water. Note: If your yard is particularly shady, add about 25% more height based on the following guide:

  • Bermuda/Perennial/Annual Rye: 1.5 – 2 inches
  • Hybrid Bermuda: 0.5 – 1 inch

Arizona Soil: 101

Did you know Arizona soil is comprised of surface, subsurface, and subsoil layers? This is important to know because it affects how your grass will grow. Subsoil is the finest of the three and contains less organic matter which is what essentially determines the condition of your lawn. In order to prepare your soil for optimal growth:

  • Alter its chemical makeup by adding organic matter such as manure to help deliver water and nutrients to your Arizona sod grass.
  • Aerate your Bermuda grass in May or June in order to give the soil better access to water and oxygen. You can also do this the day after a good monsoon rain when the soil is easy to break up.

Caring for Flowers and Other Plants

What Arizona backyard is complete without desert plants like succulents and groundcovers? Be sure you understand the needs of each type of plant that complements your lawn. For example, cacti need little water to survive, so you wouldn’t want your automatic sprinkler heads to douse them or nearby succulents. Take note of perennial grow schedules to ensure you’re caring for your grass and flowers at the right times. Lastly, make sure you know how much space you’ll need for a mature garden or shrub. You don’t want to provide too much shade to sun-dependent grass or create an obstruction of walkways.

Caring for your Arizona lawn doesn’t have to be an arduous task so long as you stay on schedule. If you don’t have time or patience to maintain your Arizona sod grass, give us a call at 480-456-1199 to discuss re-sod options. You don’t want to wait until your annual end of summer BBQ to try and take on a dead patches or overgrown weeds.

Get 10% off your next purchase of sod plus free delivery (500 sq/ft minimum order) when you order online today.

How To Keep Your Lawn From Drying Out This Summer

Wednesday, July 20th, 2016

There’s nothing worse than investing time and money into your dream yard only to see the grass wilt and dry out. Save yourself the frustration by learning how to properly care for your Arizona grass. With scorching summers and annual monsoons, it’s difficult to get things right the first time – but not impossible.

How To Ensure Your Arizona Sod Lawn Does Not Dry Out in the Summer

Commit yourself to research

Whether you’re installing fresh sod in Arizona or rehabilitating a dried out lawn inherited from prior homeowners, the first thing you should do is research the best grass and how to care for it. Take into account the soil’s pH level, shade to sunlight ratio, surrounding plant life, and your personal commitment to maintenance. Talk to neighbors whose lawns you love and ask what problems they’ve faced. A well-kept lawn does not happen by accident so it’s important to know what species is likely to thrive in your region and how much time and money you have to ensure its success.

Opt for sod over seed

Heat is a major inhibitor of healthy growth as watering can lead to nearly-instant evaporation. Seeds often require significant time to form strong roots unless you’re prepared to be diligent about watering and reseeding annually. Sod is a good choice for Arizona homeowners as its even easier to grow and maintain than starting with grass seeds for several reasons:

  • Installing sod in Arizona is a “one and done” solution to a bare lawn. Simply prepare the soil and install sod the same day it arrives.
  • Although seeding is less expensive than sod, that might not be the case in the long run if you’re forced to reseed annually and pay more for maintenance services.
  • Sod is more resistant to weeds as there is less room for the seeds to settle and germinate.
  • Sod is less likely to dry out. This is because seeds initially need to be watered several times per day to prevent dry soil. Although sod also needs moisture to become firmly rooted, the watering schedule is less demanding and decreases in frequency much earlier in the rooting process.
  • Laying sod in Arizona is perhaps most advantageous for its instant curb appeal. This is appealing to both new homeowners eager to enjoy their lawn and those looking to put their home on the market quickly.

Know how to maintain sod in Arizona

Once you’ve committed to installing sod, heed the most common tips and tricks for avoiding a dry, stressed out lawn.

  1. Stay off the sod. Constant foot traffic from children and pets places unnecessary strain on new grass that is trying to form a healthy root system.
  2. Restrict your dog to one specific area of the yard to do his business. If you can help it, try to avoid the grass completely and train him to relieve himself on the pavement (which can easily be sprayed down) or rock landscaping.
  3. Prevent over fertilization by taking the proper precautions.
  4. Closely adhere to the watering schedule of your specific sod type. Remember: the dry Arizona heat speeds up evaporation, so be mindful of the frequency and depth of watering.
  5. Water early with evenly spaced sprinklers to avoid midday evaporation and fungal diseases caused by wet grass that festers in cool temperatures overnight.
  6. Mow only at the recommended height for your particular sod and leave the clippings throughout the yard to aid water absorption.

For an estimate to install sod in Arizona or for a professional guide to preventing dry patches, contact a sod specialist at 480-456-1199.

Phoenix Area Sod Lawns being taken over by Spurge

Wednesday, November 2nd, 2011

Over the summer many lawns in the Phoenix area can develop weeds, particularly Spurge. You might recognize this weed as close to the ground, dark in color with some forms having hairy or purple-red spotted leaves and red stems. Spurge can grow in a circular shape and create a dense mat of weeds.

As you prepare your winter lawn we want to help you get rid of these pesky weeds.

Spurge is the most common turfgrass weed in the US, and Arizona in particular due to the heat. Spurge primarily grows in the summer, but it can grow well into the fall. It is easy for this weed to grow in Arizona sod in the fall since the weather remains warm here.

Your first reaction to kill this weed would be to spray it, but we advise against doing so. If you are planning to overseed your lawn, applying weed killing chemicals could slow down the growth of your new lawn. We recommend pulling the weed up with your hands, roots and all. This method of removing Spurge weeds is better for your lawn if you are preparing it for overseeding and in general, since it isn’t as harmful to your lawn.

If your lawn in Phoenix did grow Spurge this year we hope that you were able to pull it out before any real damage was done to your winter lawn. If you feel like your lawn is already a total loss you can always order fresh sod from our Arizona sod farm, already overseeded. In any case we want to help you prevent weeds from ruining all of your hard work in maintaining your sod in the Phoenix area, as it can be a struggle given our environment. The best weed prevention is a healthy lawn!

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See the University of Arizona PDF (Link) “Managing Spurge in the Landscape” for extra information beyond our blog post.